Exploring the pathways to contact with juvenile justice in Aboriginal and Torres Strait islander children: Developing a profile of the risk and protective factors to support a strategy for change

Jocelyn Rachel Jones

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

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Abstract

This thesis examined the risk and protective factors associated with juvenile justice system contact from birth to 17 years of age in a cohort of Aboriginal children. A mixed-methods study design was used with the qualitative phase informing quantitative data analysis. Multivariate modelling identified a number of factors associated with an Aboriginal child's risk of juvenile justice contact. The strongest risk factors were being male, having a substantiated child abuse or neglect notification, mothers contact with adult corrective services, mothers age and mothers Aboriginality. Results highlight a strong trajectory from child protection services to Juvenile Justice and intergenerational offending.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
Awarding Institution
  • The University of Western Australia
Award date25 Oct 2018
DOIs
Publication statusUnpublished - 2018

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