Exploring the anthelmintic properties of Australian native shrubs with respect to their potential role in livestock grazing systems

A.C. Kotze, J.O. O'Grady, J. Emms, A.F. Toovey, [No Value] Hughes. S., P. Jessop, M. Bennell, Phil Vercoe, Dean Revell

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    41 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    We measured in vitro anthelmintic activity in extracts from 85 species of Australian native shrub, with a view to identifying species able to provide a degree of worm control in grazing systems. Approximately 40% of the species showed significant activity in inhibiting development of Haemonchus contortus larvae. The most active extracts showed IC50 values of 60–300 μg/ml. Pre-incubation with polyvinylpolypyrrolidine removed the activity from some extracts, implicating tannins as the bioactive agent, while in other cases the pre-incubation had no effect, indicating the presence of other anthelmintic compounds. Plant reproductive maturity (onset of flowering or fruiting) was associated with increasing anthelmintic activity in some species. Variability was observed between plants of the same species growing in different environments, while variation between individual plants of the same species within a single field suggests the existence of distinct chemotypes. Significant activity against adult H. contortus worms in vitro was also demonstrated in a limited number of extracts tested against this life stage. Our study indicates that there is potential for Australian native shrubs to play an anthelmintic role in grazing systems, and highlights some plant biology factors which will need to be considered in order to maximize any anthelmintic effects.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1060-1080
    JournalParasitology
    Volume136
    Issue number9
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2009

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