Exploring stakeholders' perceptions of the acceptability, usability, and dissemination of the australian 24-hour movement guidelines for the early years

Rebecca Stanley, Rachel Jones, Christian Swan, Hayley Christian, Julie Sherring, Trevor Shilton, Anthony Okely

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Australian 24-Hour Movement Guidelines for the Early Years were recently developed. To maximize the uptake of the guidelines, perceptions of key stakeholders were sought. Methods: Thirty-five stakeholders (11% Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander descent) participated in focus groups or key informant interviews. Stakeholders included parents of children aged 0-5 years, early childhood educators, and health and policy professionals, recruited using convenience and snowballing techniques. Focus groups and interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Data were analyzed inductively using thematic analysis. Results: There was general acceptance of the Movement Guidelines. The stakeholders suggested that the Guidelines were highly aspirational and needed to be carefully messaged, so parents did not feel guilty if their child was not meeting them. Stakeholders identified that the messaging needed to be culturally appropriate and visually appealing. Dissemination strategies differed depending on the stakeholder. Conclusion: Seeking stakeholder perceptions is an important process in the development of national Movement Guidelines. This study successfully examined stakeholders' perceptions regarding the acceptability, usability, and dissemination of the Australian 24-Hour Movement Guidelines. Effective and innovative strategies for maximizing compliance and uptake of the Guidelines should be prioritized.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)120-125
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Physical Activity and Health
Volume17
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2020

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