Exploiting the unique regenerative capacity of the liver to underpin cell and gene therapy strategies for genetic and acquired liver disease

Grant J. Logan, Gustavo De Alencastro, Ian E. Alexander, George C. Yeoh

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The number of genetic or acquired diseases of the liver treatable by organ transplantation is ever-increasing as transplantation techniques improve placing additional demands on an already limited organ supply. While cell and gene therapies are distinctly different modalities, they offer a synergistic alternative to organ transplant due to distinct architectural and physiological properties of the liver. The hepatic blood supply and fenestrated endothelial system affords relatively facile accessibility for cell and/or gene delivery. More importantly, however, the remarkable capacity of hepatocytes to proliferate and repopulate the liver creates opportunities for new treatments based on emerging technologies. This review will summarise current understanding of liver regeneration, describe clinical and experimental cell and gene therapeutic modalities and discuss critical challenges to translate these new technologies to wider clinical utility. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: "Regenerative Medicine: the challenge of translation".

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)141-152
Number of pages12
JournalInternational Journal of Biochemistry and Cell Biology
Volume56
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2014

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