Expert consensus on the attributes and competencies required for rural and remote junior physicians to work effectively in isolated indonesian communities

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Indonesian physicians working in rural and remote areas must be equipped not only with generic competencies but also with the attributes and skills necessary to provide health care services without compromising quality. This study sought to reach a consensus on the attributes and competencies that are viewed as essential and important for working effectively as an early career doctor in rural and remote practice in Indonesia. A two round Delphi study was conducted by reference to 27 consenting physicians working in rural and remote Indonesia. Forty-three items covering 9 attributes and 34 competencies were sent to these physicians to be rated on a Likert scale ranging from 1 to 5 in terms of their importance for effective rural and remote practice. Nine attributes and 29 competencies progressed to Round 2. All nine attributes and 29 competencies were identified as essential or important for junior physicians’ ability to be effective in their practice. The essential attributes included professional quality related to prioritising the rural community. The essential competencies included medical skills, professional behaviour, interprofessional skills, health promotion and connection to the rural community. The consensus thus reached on these essential and important attributes and competencies can inform curriculum development for the undergraduate and postgraduate training of junior rural
and remote physicians.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)587-609
Number of pages23
JournalAdvances in Health Sciences Education
Volume29
Issue number2
Early online date9 Aug 2023
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2024

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Expert consensus on the attributes and competencies required for rural and remote junior physicians to work effectively in isolated indonesian communities'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this