Experience of patients with lung cancer and with targeted therapy-related skin adverse drug reactions: A qualitative study

Ruofei Du, Huashan Yang, Jizhe Zhu, Huiyue Zhou, Lixia Ma, Mikiyas Amare Getu, Changying Chen, Tao Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To explore the experience of non-small-cell lung cancer patients with targeted therapy-related skin adverse drug reactions. Methods: This is a descriptive quantitative study conducted in a comprehensive hospital in Henan, China. Purposive sampling was used to recruit patients with non-small-cell lung cancer and with targeted therapy-related skin adverse drug reactions. In total, 23 patients were approached when the data were saturated. Face-to-face interviews were conducted by an independent researcher using a semi-structured interview guide. Interview data were transcribed and analyzed by qualitative inductive content analysis. Results: Based on the analysis, four main categories were identified according to patients' descriptions of their experience: a lack of self-management ability, psychological and emotional problems, a barrier to social participation, and a need for social support. Suffering from persistent symptoms, insufficient knowledge, skills and strategies for skin adverse drug reaction management, psychological problems, social avoidance/withdrawal, and reduced willingness to work were core experiences that would affect patients' compliance with treatment, prognosis, and the overall quality of life. Conclusions: This study revealed the real experience of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer and with targeted therapy-related skin adverse drug reactions which contributed to the development of targeted interventions to manage skin adverse reactions.
Original languageEnglish
Article number100115
Number of pages8
JournalAsia-Pacific journal of oncology nursing
Volume9
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2022

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