Experience of introducing screening for intimate partner violence and reproductive coercion in an urban sexual health clinic

Mariana Galrao, Alison Creagh, Richelle Douglas, Sarah Smith, Cathy Brooker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Intimate partner violence (IPV) and reproductive coercion (RC) can result in serious psychological, social and physical harm. Screening patients for IPV/RC has the potential to identify and assist patients who may not otherwise discuss this with a health practitioner. Targeted screening for those with a range of specific presentations including many sexual and reproductive health issues has been recommended, but universal screening has not. Methods: The implementation and evaluation of a screening program for IPV and RC in an urban sexual and reproductive health clinic is described. Results: The program enabled patients who had been exposed to IPV and/or RC to receive assistance and support. Screening was highly acceptable to patients, and the reception and clinical staff became both highly supportive of screening and increasingly confident to assist patients who were exposed to IPV and/or RC. Conclusion and implications for public health: This program could be adapted for use in a number of healthcare settings and lead to positive health outcomes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)889-895
Number of pages7
JournalAustralian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health
Volume46
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2022

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