Examining the role of trait anxiety and attentional bias to negative information in intrusion vulnerability following an acute negative event

Ines Pandzic

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

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Abstract

Research shows that individuals with heightened trait anxiety are more likely to experience intrusions. However, the mechanisms through which trait anxiety can influence intrusions remain unknown. This research program investigated attentional biases to negative information as candidate mechanisms. Results revealed that different mechanisms may be associated with individual differences in intrusion frequency and distress but do not appear to make a causal contribution. Future research seeking to understand individual differences in intrusion vulnerability should aim to discriminate mechanisms that may contribute to variation in intrusion frequency from those that may contribute to variation in intrusion-related distress.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
Awarding Institution
  • The University of Western Australia
Supervisors/Advisors
  • MacLeod, Colin, Supervisor
  • Notebaert, Lies, Supervisor
Thesis sponsors
Award date4 Aug 2021
DOIs
Publication statusUnpublished - 2021

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