Examining context-specific perceptions of risk: exploring the utility of 'human-in-the-loop" simulation models for criminology

A. Park, Joseph Clare, V. Spicer, P.L. Brantingham, T. Calvert, G. Jenion

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives To utilize a “human-in-the-loop” simulation methodology to examine the impact of high-risk environmental contexts on perceptions of victimization risk.
Methods Fifty-nine participants navigated a virtual environment and encountered
five two-alternative forced-choice decision points, with one alternative representing a high-risk environmental context in each case.
Results Participants risk-aware decision-making was examined as a function of sex and age, both for their decisions overall and also at each specific decision point. Overall differences in total risk-aware decisions were observed for sex (with females more risk aware) but not age. In addition to this, variation in perceived risk was also observed across the range of high-risk environmental contexts and there was also some indication of varying influence of age and sex on specific types of risk-aware decisions.
Conclusions These results have interesting implications for research into context specific perceptions of risk. These findings also support a stance that “human-in-the loop” simulation modeling has good potential to contribute to criminology more broadly.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)29-47
JournalJournal of Experimental Criminology
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

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