Examining associations between area-level spatial measures of housing with selected health and wellbeing behaviours and outcomes in an urban context

Hannah Badland, Sarah Foster, Rebecca Bentley, Carl Higgs, Rebecca Roberts, Christopher Pettit, Billie Giles-Corti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)
216 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Adequate and affordable housing is a major social determinant of health; yet no work has attempted to conceptually map and spatially test area-level measures of housing with selected health and wellbeing outcomes. Sourcing data from 7,753 adults from Melbourne, Australia, we tested associations between area-level measures of housing density, tenure, and affordability with individual-level measures of neighbourhood safety, community satisfaction, and self-rated health. Compared with the reference groups, the odds of: feeling unsafe was higher for residents living in areas with less affordable housing; community dissatisfaction was ~30% higher in those living in areas with >36% residential properties assigned as rentals, and was significantly higher in the least affordable areas (OR =1.57). Compared with the reference groups, as dwelling density, proportion of rental properties, and housing unaffordability increased, the odds of reporting poorer self-rated health increased; however these associations did not always reach statistical significance. This work highlights the benefits of evidenced-based planning spatial measures to support health and wellbeing.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)17-24
Number of pages8
JournalHealth and Place
Volume43
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2017

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