Examination of systematic variations in burglars' domain-specific perceptual and procedural skills

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    28 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    This research examines systematic variations in residential burglars' domain-specific perceptual and procedural skills. Utilising a formula incorporating frequency of offending, generation of offending-related income, burglary charges, and estimated duration of burglary career, 53 experts and 53 novices were objectively identified from a sample of 209 interviews conducted with incarcerated burglars. The perceptual and procedural burglary skills of these two groups were compared and the results demonstrated important differences indicative of superior domain-specific performance for objectively classified experts. The theoretical implications of these findings are discussed, along with suggestions for application of this knowledge to crime prevention initiatives.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)199
    Number of pages214
    JournalPsychology, Crime and Law
    Volume17
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2010

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    Cite this

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    abstract = "This research examines systematic variations in residential burglars' domain-specific perceptual and procedural skills. Utilising a formula incorporating frequency of offending, generation of offending-related income, burglary charges, and estimated duration of burglary career, 53 experts and 53 novices were objectively identified from a sample of 209 interviews conducted with incarcerated burglars. The perceptual and procedural burglary skills of these two groups were compared and the results demonstrated important differences indicative of superior domain-specific performance for objectively classified experts. The theoretical implications of these findings are discussed, along with suggestions for application of this knowledge to crime prevention initiatives.",
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    Examination of systematic variations in burglars' domain-specific perceptual and procedural skills. / Clare, Joseph.

    In: Psychology, Crime and Law, Vol. 17, No. 3, 2010, p. 199.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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