Evidence for fungi and gold redox interaction under Earth surface conditions

Tsing Bohu, Ravi Anand, Ryan Noble, Mel Lintern, Anna H. Kaksonen, Yuan Mei, Ka Yu Cheng, Xiao Deng, Jean-Pierre Veder, Michael Bunce, Matthew Power, Mike Verrall

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Microbial contribution to gold biogeochemical cycling has been proposed. However, studies have focused primarily on the influence of prokaryotes on gold reduction and precipitation through a detoxification-oriented mechanism. Here we show, fungi, a major driver of mineral bioweathering, can initiate gold oxidation under Earth surface conditions, which is of significance for dissolved gold species formation and distribution. Presence of the gold-oxidizing fungus TA_pink1, an isolate of Fusarium oxysporum, suggests fungi have the potential to substantially impact gold biogeochemical cycling. Our data further reveal that indigenous fungal diversity positively correlates with in situ gold concentrations. Hypocreales, the order of the gold-oxidizing fungus, show the highest centrality in the fungal microbiome of the auriferous environment. Therefore, we argue that the redox interaction between fungi and gold is critical and should be considered in gold biogeochemical cycling.

Original languageEnglish
Article number2290
Number of pages13
JournalNature Communications
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 23 May 2019

Cite this

Bohu, T., Anand, R., Noble, R., Lintern, M., Kaksonen, A. H., Mei, Y., ... Verrall, M. (2019). Evidence for fungi and gold redox interaction under Earth surface conditions. Nature Communications, 10(1), [2290]. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-019-10006-5
Bohu, Tsing ; Anand, Ravi ; Noble, Ryan ; Lintern, Mel ; Kaksonen, Anna H. ; Mei, Yuan ; Cheng, Ka Yu ; Deng, Xiao ; Veder, Jean-Pierre ; Bunce, Michael ; Power, Matthew ; Verrall, Mike. / Evidence for fungi and gold redox interaction under Earth surface conditions. In: Nature Communications. 2019 ; Vol. 10, No. 1.
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Bohu, T, Anand, R, Noble, R, Lintern, M, Kaksonen, AH, Mei, Y, Cheng, KY, Deng, X, Veder, J-P, Bunce, M, Power, M & Verrall, M 2019, 'Evidence for fungi and gold redox interaction under Earth surface conditions' Nature Communications, vol. 10, no. 1, 2290. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-019-10006-5

Evidence for fungi and gold redox interaction under Earth surface conditions. / Bohu, Tsing; Anand, Ravi; Noble, Ryan; Lintern, Mel; Kaksonen, Anna H.; Mei, Yuan; Cheng, Ka Yu; Deng, Xiao; Veder, Jean-Pierre; Bunce, Michael; Power, Matthew; Verrall, Mike.

In: Nature Communications, Vol. 10, No. 1, 2290, 23.05.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Bohu, Tsing

AU - Anand, Ravi

AU - Noble, Ryan

AU - Lintern, Mel

AU - Kaksonen, Anna H.

AU - Mei, Yuan

AU - Cheng, Ka Yu

AU - Deng, Xiao

AU - Veder, Jean-Pierre

AU - Bunce, Michael

AU - Power, Matthew

AU - Verrall, Mike

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