Evening electronic device use: The effects on alertness, sleep and next-day physical performance in athletes

Maddison J. Jones, Peter Peeling, Brian Dawson, Shona Halson, Joanna Miller, Ian Dunican, Michael Clarke, Carmel Goodman, Peter Eastwood

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of different types of tasks performed with or without an electronic device (tablet) on pre-sleep alertness, subsequent sleep quality and next-day athletic performance. Eight highly trained netball players attended a sleep laboratory for pre-sleep testing, polysomnographic sleep monitoring and next-day physical performance testing on 5 separate occasions (1 familiarisation and 4 experimental sessions). For 2 h prior to bedtime, athletes completed cognitively stimulating tasks (puzzles) or passive tasks (reading) with or without a tablet. Sleepiness tended to be greater after reading compared to completing puzzles without a tablet (d = 0.80), but not with a tablet. Melatonin concentration increased more so after reading compared to completing puzzles on a tablet (P = 0.02). There were no significant differences in sleep quality or quantity or next-day athletic performance between any of the conditions. These data suggest that using a tablet for 2 h prior to sleep does not negatively affect subsequent sleep or next-day performance in athletes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)162-170
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Sports Sciences
Volume36
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 17 Jan 2018

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