EVE: a health education intervention program for girls and the impact of the EVE program on the perceived competence and self-esteem through autonomy

Fiona Tan

    Research output: ThesisMaster's Thesis

    194 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    [Truncated] Educators teaching Health Education in Western Australia are seeking ways to make Health Education lessons more relevant, impactful and effective to teenagers in the current context of our times. In an attempt to empower the students to take greater ownership of their health, the teachers of a school designed a Health Education intervention program for teenage girls. Coined to represent the coming of age for girls who are on the eve of womanhood, the EVE program was set up as an external program to complement the existing Health Education lessons of the formal curriculum. Adopting the self-determination theory (SDT), this study evaluated the effects of choice on participation in the 6-week EVE program on perceived competence, relatedness and self-esteem which was school-based for Year 10 girls (aged 15-16). Presenters of the EVE program were teachers of the school as well as from external, government health agencies. The study assessed the effects on the utility of choice in enhancing self-regulatory processes with regards to health through a 6-week intervention program held before school hours. A total of 35, Year 10 girls from the same school within the southern suburb of Western Australia, Perth, participated in this evaluation program (intervention: n=20, control: n=15). All participants completed self-report perception questionnaires at pre and post stages of the EVE program. As defined by the Curriculum Council of Western Australia in 2005, health and well-being encompasses the domains of knowledge and understanding, self-management and interpersonal skills for effective relationships and healthy, active lifestyles (Council, 2005). As such, in evaluating impact of the program, key variables of autonomy, knowledge and understanding, perceived competence, relatedness and global self-esteem were used as part of the evaluation process. Statistical analysis was done using SPANOVA (split-plot analysis of variance) and comparisons with the
    Original languageEnglish
    QualificationMasters
    Publication statusUnpublished - 2010

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