Evaluation of the new vacuum infiltration vitrification (viv) cryopreservation technique for native Australian plant shoot tips

B. Funnekotter, Susan Whiteley, Shane Turner, Eric Bunn, R.L. Mancera

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    6 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    BACKGROUND: The application of a vacuum during the incubation in cryoprotective agents such as PVS2 allows for increased penetration, reducing total incubation times required before vitrification and post-cryopreservation regeneration is achieved. OBJECTIVE: This study compared a conventional droplet-vitrification protocol to the new vacuum infiltration vitrification protocol in four Australian plant species. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The new vacuum infiltration vitrification applied an 80 kPa vacuum during incubations in loading solution and PVS2. Infiltration of the cryoprotective agents into shoot tips was determined by differential scanning calorimetry measuring ice formation in the thermographs comparing a range of loading solution and PVS2 incubation times. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: The application of the vacuum infiltration vitrification technique resulted in a significantly reduced PVS2 incubation time for cryogenic survival and regeneration for all four species, reducing the time needed to adequately protect shoot tips by half to a quarter when compared to a conventional droplet-vitrification technique.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)104-113
    JournalCryoletters
    Volume36
    Issue number2
    Publication statusPublished - 2015

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    Plant Shoots
    Vitrification
    Cryopreservation
    Vacuum
    Cryoprotective Agents
    Regeneration
    Differential Scanning Calorimetry
    Ice

    Cite this

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    title = "Evaluation of the new vacuum infiltration vitrification (viv) cryopreservation technique for native Australian plant shoot tips",
    abstract = "BACKGROUND: The application of a vacuum during the incubation in cryoprotective agents such as PVS2 allows for increased penetration, reducing total incubation times required before vitrification and post-cryopreservation regeneration is achieved. OBJECTIVE: This study compared a conventional droplet-vitrification protocol to the new vacuum infiltration vitrification protocol in four Australian plant species. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The new vacuum infiltration vitrification applied an 80 kPa vacuum during incubations in loading solution and PVS2. Infiltration of the cryoprotective agents into shoot tips was determined by differential scanning calorimetry measuring ice formation in the thermographs comparing a range of loading solution and PVS2 incubation times. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: The application of the vacuum infiltration vitrification technique resulted in a significantly reduced PVS2 incubation time for cryogenic survival and regeneration for all four species, reducing the time needed to adequately protect shoot tips by half to a quarter when compared to a conventional droplet-vitrification technique.",
    author = "B. Funnekotter and Susan Whiteley and Shane Turner and Eric Bunn and R.L. Mancera",
    year = "2015",
    language = "English",
    volume = "36",
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    Evaluation of the new vacuum infiltration vitrification (viv) cryopreservation technique for native Australian plant shoot tips. / Funnekotter, B.; Whiteley, Susan; Turner, Shane; Bunn, Eric; Mancera, R.L.

    In: Cryoletters, Vol. 36, No. 2, 2015, p. 104-113.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Evaluation of the new vacuum infiltration vitrification (viv) cryopreservation technique for native Australian plant shoot tips

    AU - Funnekotter, B.

    AU - Whiteley, Susan

    AU - Turner, Shane

    AU - Bunn, Eric

    AU - Mancera, R.L.

    PY - 2015

    Y1 - 2015

    N2 - BACKGROUND: The application of a vacuum during the incubation in cryoprotective agents such as PVS2 allows for increased penetration, reducing total incubation times required before vitrification and post-cryopreservation regeneration is achieved. OBJECTIVE: This study compared a conventional droplet-vitrification protocol to the new vacuum infiltration vitrification protocol in four Australian plant species. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The new vacuum infiltration vitrification applied an 80 kPa vacuum during incubations in loading solution and PVS2. Infiltration of the cryoprotective agents into shoot tips was determined by differential scanning calorimetry measuring ice formation in the thermographs comparing a range of loading solution and PVS2 incubation times. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: The application of the vacuum infiltration vitrification technique resulted in a significantly reduced PVS2 incubation time for cryogenic survival and regeneration for all four species, reducing the time needed to adequately protect shoot tips by half to a quarter when compared to a conventional droplet-vitrification technique.

    AB - BACKGROUND: The application of a vacuum during the incubation in cryoprotective agents such as PVS2 allows for increased penetration, reducing total incubation times required before vitrification and post-cryopreservation regeneration is achieved. OBJECTIVE: This study compared a conventional droplet-vitrification protocol to the new vacuum infiltration vitrification protocol in four Australian plant species. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The new vacuum infiltration vitrification applied an 80 kPa vacuum during incubations in loading solution and PVS2. Infiltration of the cryoprotective agents into shoot tips was determined by differential scanning calorimetry measuring ice formation in the thermographs comparing a range of loading solution and PVS2 incubation times. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: The application of the vacuum infiltration vitrification technique resulted in a significantly reduced PVS2 incubation time for cryogenic survival and regeneration for all four species, reducing the time needed to adequately protect shoot tips by half to a quarter when compared to a conventional droplet-vitrification technique.

    M3 - Article

    VL - 36

    SP - 104

    EP - 113

    JO - Cryoletters

    JF - Cryoletters

    SN - 0143-2044

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