Evaluation of a resistance training program for adults with or at risk of developing diabetes: An effectiveness study in a community setting

Karl E. Minges, Glen Cormick, Edna Unglik, David W. Dunstan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: To examine the effects of a community-based resistance training program (Lift for Life®) on waist circumference and functional measures in adults with or at risk of developing type 2 diabetes.Methods: Lift for Life is a research-to-practice initiative designed to disseminate an evidence-based resistance training program for adults with or at risk of developing type 2 diabetes to existing health and fitness facilities in the Australian community. A retrospective assessment was undertaken on 86 participants who had accessed the program within 4 active providers in Melbourne, Australia. The primary goal of this longitudinal study was to assess the effectiveness of a community-based resistance training program, thereby precluding a randomized, controlled study design. Waist circumference, lower body (chair sit-to-stand) and upper body (arm curl test) strength, and agility (timed up-and-go) measures were collected at baseline and repeated at 2 months (n = 86) and again at 6 months (n = 32).Results: Relative to baseline, there was a significant decrease in mean waist circumference (-1.9 cm, 95% CI: -2.8 to -1.0) and the timed agility test (-0.8 secs, 95% CI: -1.0 to -0.6); and significant increases in lower body (number of repetitions: 2.2, 95% CI: 1.4-3.0) and upper body (number of repetitions: 3.8, 95% CI: 3.0-4.6) strength at the completion of 8 weeks. Significant differences remained at the 16 week assessment. Pooled time series regression analyses adjusted for age and sex in the 32 participants who had complete measures at baseline and 24-week follow-up revealed significant time effects for waist circumference and functional measures, with the greatest change from baseline observed at the 24-week assessment.Conclusions: These findings indicate that an evidence-based resistance training program administered in the community setting for those with or at risk of developing type 2 diabetes, can lead to favorable health benefits, including reductions in central obesity and improved physical function.

Original languageEnglish
Article number50
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
Volume8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 25 May 2011
Externally publishedYes

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