Evaluation and characterisation of differential virulence among Escherichia coli following perforation of the gastrointestinal tract

Joanna Lee

    Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

    14 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    [Truncated] Extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) are a sub-category of E. coli capable of causing diseases outside the gastrointestinal tract. ExPECs exhibit both commensalism and pathogenic behaviour in a human host. When they are found in the gastrointestinal tract, ExPEC strains colonise as commensals in the microflora and do not harm the human host. If ExPECs exit the gastrointestinal tract and gain access to other, normally sterile sites in the body, then they are capable of causing infection at those sites. One such infection is secondary peritonitis. It occurs when a perforation of the gut wall causes bulk spillage of gastrointestinal contents into the peritoneal cavity. Although many bacterial species are represented in the microflora of the large intestine, a typical case of secondary peritonitis involves only about five species: three obligate anaerobes and two facultative anaerobes. The most common facultative anaerobe isolated in secondary peritonitis is E. coli. As all E. coli present in the peritoneal cavity must originate from the gut lumen, this 'naturally occurring' experiment was utilised to evaluate differential capacity for E. coli to survive and proliferate in the peritoneum following inoculation from the lumen via a perforation.
    Original languageEnglish
    QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
    Awarding Institution
    • The University of Western Australia
    DOIs
    Publication statusUnpublished - 2009

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