Evaluating Structural Models of Cognitive Vulnerabilities: Transdiagnostic and Specific Pathways to Internalizing Symptoms

Ruth Y. N. Poh, Sici Zhuang, Xiang Ling Ong, Ryan Y. Hong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The structure of cognitive vulnerabilities to anxiety and depression was examined via a hierarchical approach to examine
the usefulness of a bifactor model for identifying a broad transdiagnostic (i.e., common core) factor versus disorder-specific
variables (i.e., unique dimensions) in predicting internalizing psychopathology. Several models (i.e., single factor,
correlated factor, single hierarchical, and bifactor models) were evaluated in undergraduate (n = 351) and adolescent
(n = 385) samples. Across both samples, the bifactor model exhibited comparable good fit as the correlated and single
hierarchical models. This model comprised a core transdiagnostic vulnerability factor and six specific factors (i.e., negative
cognitive style, dysfunctional attitudes, ruminative style, intolerance of uncertainty, anxiety sensitivity, and fear of negative
evaluation). Although the transdiagnostic factor predicted a general internalizing symptom factor, unique fear-related
specific-level associations between individual vulnerability and symptom remained significant. Moreover, the transdiagnostic
vulnerability factor predicted internalizing symptoms, even after controlling for personality and gender. These findings
highlight the importance of advancing an integrative etiologic model of internalizing psychopathology.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages21
JournalAssessment
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 24 Apr 2020
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Evaluating Structural Models of Cognitive Vulnerabilities: Transdiagnostic and Specific Pathways to Internalizing Symptoms'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this