Ethnic differences in diet and associations with clinical markers of prostate disease in New Zealand men

A. Harris, M.A. Gray, D.P. Slaney, M.L. Turley, J.R. Fowles, Philip Weinstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To examine ethnic differences in diet and dietary associations with clinical markers of prostate disease in New Zealand men. Materials and Methods: A total of 1031 males (616 New Zealand European, 230 Maori and 185 Pacific Islands) aged 40-69 years, with no history of prostate cancer, completed a questionnaire covering diet. A serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) blood analysis was also undertaken. Regression models were developed to examine the ethnic-specific levels of selected dietary components, and their relationship with PSA and urinary symptom scores. Results: The results confirmed previously found ethnic differences in the New Zealand diet. Combined tomato intake was positively-correlated with free PSA and % free PSA (p =0.021, r=0.197 and p=0.011, r=0.096 respectively). Beer intake was negatively-correlated with total PSA (p=0.028, r=-0.071) and free PSA (p=0.004, r=-0.094). Conclusion: Ethnic differences found in the consumption of foods (associated with prostate cancer) highlight the possible importance of dietary interactions for ethnic prostate cancer risk. Associations between specific foods and PSA warrant further investigation.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2551-2556
JournalAnticancer Research
Volume24
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 2004

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