Estimation of the mechanical properties of the airways and respiratory tissues in infants by low-frequency forced oscillations

Graham Hall

    Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

    16 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    [Truncated] Infant lung function tests commonly assess forced expiratory flows and/or volumes. These techniques are unable to provide information on the site of changes in lung mechanics. Preliminary studies using the low-frequency forced oscillation technique (FOT) have shown the technique able to determine the low-frequency impedance spectra (Zrs). A model, containing frequency independent airway and constant-phase tissue compartments can be fitted to Zrs and provide an assessment of both the airway and respiratory tissue mechanics. Aims: The aims were: (1) use the low-frequency FOT to partition Zrs into lung (Zl) and chest wall (Zw) impedances and subsequently into nasal (Zn) and lower respiratory system impedances (Zlrs); (2) characterise the relationship between the airway and respiratory tissue mechanics and length in normal infants; (3) compare the airway and respiratory tissue mechanics in wheezy infants with those of normal infants; and (4) assess the methacholine responsiveness in infants using the low-frequency FOT.
    Original languageEnglish
    QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
    Awarding Institution
    • The University of Western Australia
    DOIs
    Publication statusUnpublished - 2000

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