Estimation of population affinity using proximal femoral measurements based on computed tomographic images in the Japanese and western Australian populations

Suguru Torimitsu, Akari Nakazawa, Ambika Flavel, Lauren Swift, Yohsuke Makino, Hirotaro Iwase, Daniel Franklin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The present study analyzes morphological differences femora of contemporary Japanese and Western Australian individuals and investigates the feasibility of population affinity estimation based on computed tomographic (CT) data. The latter is deemed to be of practical importance because most anthropological methods rely on the assessment of aspects of skull morphology, which when damaged and/or unavailable, often hampers attempts to estimate population affinity. The study sample comprised CT scans of 297 (146 females; 151 males) Japanese and 330 (145 females; 185 males) Western Australian adult individuals. A total of 10 measurements were acquired in two-dimensional CT images of the left and right femora; two machine learning methods (random forest modeling [RFM]) and support vector machine [SVM]) were then applied for population affinity classification. The accuracy of the two-way (sex-specific and sex-mixed) model was between 71.38 and 82.07% and 76.09–86.09% for RFM and SVM, respectively. Sex-specific (female and male) models were slightly more accurate compared to the sex-mixed models; there were no considerable differences in the correct classification rates between the female- and male-specific models. All the classification accuracies were higher in the Western Australian population, except for the male model using SVM. The four-way sex and population affinity model had an overall classification accuracy of 74.96% and 79.11% for RFM and SVM, respectively. The Western Australian females had the lowest correct classification rate followed by the Japanese males. Our data indicate that femoral measurements may be particularly useful for classification of Japanese and Western Australian individuals.

Original languageEnglish
JournalInternational Journal of Legal Medicine
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 20 May 2024

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