Epizootic Activity of Murray Valley Encephalitis and Kunjin Viruses in an Aboriginal Community in the Southeast Kimberley Region of Western Australia: Results of Mosquito Fauna and Virus Isolation Studies

A.K. Broom, Michael Lindsay, A.E. Wright, David Smith, J.S. Mackenzie

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We undertook annual surveys of flavivirus virus activity in the community of Billiluna of Western Australia in the southeast Kimberley region between 1989 and 2001. Culex annulirostris was the dominant mosquito species, particularly in years of above average rains and flooding. Murray Valley encephalitis (MVE) virus was isolated in 8 of the 13 years of the study from seven mosquito species, but more than 90% of the isolates were from Cx. annulirostris. The results suggest that MVE virus is epizootic in the region, with activity only apparent in years with average or above average rainfall and increased numbers of Cx. annulirostris. High levels of MVE virus activity and associated human cases were detected only once (in 1993) during the survey period. Activity of MVE virus could only be partially correlated with wet season rainfall and flooding, suggesting that a number of other factors must also be considered to accurately predict MVE virus activity at such communities.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)277-283
JournalAmerican Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Volume69
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 2003

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Epizootic Activity of Murray Valley Encephalitis and Kunjin Viruses in an Aboriginal Community in the Southeast Kimberley Region of Western Australia: Results of Mosquito Fauna and Virus Isolation Studies'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this