Epithelial separation theory for post-tonsillectomy secondary hemorrhage: evidence in a mouse model and potential heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor therapy

Daniel M. Beswick, Chloe Santa Maria, Noel F. Ayoub, Robson Capasso, Peter Luke Santa Maria

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To provide histological evidence to investigate a theory for post-tonsillectomy secondary hemorrhage (PTH) in a mouse model and to evaluate the potential for heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF) treatment on wound healing in this model. Methods: A prospective randomized single-blinded cohort study. A uniform tongue wound was created in 84 mice (day 0). Mice were randomized to HB-EGF (treatment, n = 42) or saline (control, n = 42). In treatment mice, HB-EGF 5 µg/ml was administered intramuscularly into the wound daily (days 0–14). In control mice, normal saline was administered daily. Three mice from each group were sacrificed daily through day 14 and the wounds evaluated histologically by blinded reviewers. Results: Key stages of wound healing, including keratinocyte proliferation and migration, wound contraction, epithelial separation, and neoangiogenesis, are defined with implications for post-tonsillectomy wound healing. Epithelial separation (59 vs. 100%, p = 0.003) and wound reopening (8 vs. 48%, p < 0.001) were reduced with HB-EGF. Epithelial thickness (220 vs. 30 µm, p = 0.04) was greater with HB-EGF. Wound closure (days 4–5 vs. day 6, p = 0.01) occurred earlier with HB-EGF. Conclusions: In healing of oral keratinocytes on muscle epithelial separation secondary to muscle, contraction occurs concurrently with neoangiogenesis in the base of the wound, increasing the risk of hemorrhage. This potentially explains why post-tonsillectomy secondary hemorrhage occurs and its timing. HB-EGF-treated wounds showed greater epithelial thickness, less frequent epithelial separation and wound reopening, and earlier wound closure prior to neovascularization, suggesting that HB-EGF may be a potential preventative therapy for PTH. Level of evidence: NA—animal studies or basic research.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)569–578
Number of pages10
JournalEuropean Archives of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology
Volume275
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

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