Environmental constraints on Holocene cold-water coral reef growth off Norway: Insights from a multiproxy approach

Jacek Raddatz, Volker Liebetrau, Julie Trotter, Andres Rüggeberg, Sascha Flögel, Wolf Christian Dullo, Anton Eisenhauer, Silke Voigt, Malcolm McCulloch

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Abstract

High-latitude cold-water coral (CWC) reefs are particularly susceptible due to enhanced CO2 uptake in these regions. Using precisely dated (U/Th) CWCs (Lophelia pertusa) retrieved during research cruise POS 391 (Lopphavet 70.6°N, Oslofjord 59°N) we applied boron isotopes (δ11B), Ba/Ca, Li/Mg, and U/Ca ratios to reconstruct the environmental boundary conditions of CWC reef growth. The sedimentary record from these CWC reefs reveals a lack of corals between ~6.4 and 4.8 ka. The question remains if this phenomenon is related to changes in the carbonate system or other causes. The initial postglacial setting had elevated Ba/Ca ratios, indicative of meltwater fluxes showing a decreasing trend toward cessation at 6.4 ka with an oscillation pattern similar to continental glacier fluctuations. Downcore U/Ca ratios reveal an increasing trend, which is outside the range of modern U/Ca variability in L. pertusa, suggesting changes of seawater pH near 6.4 ka. The reconstructed bottom water temperature at Lopphavet reveals a striking similarity to Barent sea surface and subsea surface temperature records. We infer that meltwater pulses weakened the North Atlantic Current system, resulting in southward advances of cold and CO2-rich Arctic waters. A corresponding shift in the δ11B record from ~25.0‰ to ~27.0‰ probably implies enhanced pH up-regulation of the CWCs due to the higher pCO2 concentrations of ambient seawater, which hastened mid-Holocene CWC reef decline on the Norwegian margin.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1350-1367
Number of pages18
JournalPaleoceanography
Volume31
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2016

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environmental constraint
cold water
coral reef
Holocene
meltwater
boron isotope
seawater
carbonate system
Postglacial
bottom water
sea surface
coral
glacier
surface temperature
water temperature
boundary condition
oscillation
water
trend

Cite this

Raddatz, Jacek ; Liebetrau, Volker ; Trotter, Julie ; Rüggeberg, Andres ; Flögel, Sascha ; Dullo, Wolf Christian ; Eisenhauer, Anton ; Voigt, Silke ; McCulloch, Malcolm. / Environmental constraints on Holocene cold-water coral reef growth off Norway : Insights from a multiproxy approach. In: Paleoceanography. 2016 ; Vol. 31, No. 10. pp. 1350-1367.
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Raddatz, J, Liebetrau, V, Trotter, J, Rüggeberg, A, Flögel, S, Dullo, WC, Eisenhauer, A, Voigt, S & McCulloch, M 2016, 'Environmental constraints on Holocene cold-water coral reef growth off Norway: Insights from a multiproxy approach' Paleoceanography, vol. 31, no. 10, pp. 1350-1367. https://doi.org/10.1002/2016PA002974

Environmental constraints on Holocene cold-water coral reef growth off Norway : Insights from a multiproxy approach. / Raddatz, Jacek; Liebetrau, Volker; Trotter, Julie; Rüggeberg, Andres; Flögel, Sascha; Dullo, Wolf Christian; Eisenhauer, Anton; Voigt, Silke; McCulloch, Malcolm.

In: Paleoceanography, Vol. 31, No. 10, 01.10.2016, p. 1350-1367.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Environmental constraints on Holocene cold-water coral reef growth off Norway

T2 - Insights from a multiproxy approach

AU - Raddatz, Jacek

AU - Liebetrau, Volker

AU - Trotter, Julie

AU - Rüggeberg, Andres

AU - Flögel, Sascha

AU - Dullo, Wolf Christian

AU - Eisenhauer, Anton

AU - Voigt, Silke

AU - McCulloch, Malcolm

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