Enhancing ecosystem services through afforestation: How policy can help

L.E. Barry, R. Yao, D.R. Harrison, U.H. Paragahawewa, David Pannell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We employ an integrated spatial economic model to assess the net private and public benefits of converting marginal agricultural land into forest plantations (afforestation) in New Zealand. For numerous locations, we conduct policy analysis considering the magnitudes of net private and public benefits of land use changes to determine whether a policy response is justified and, if so, to identify the appropriate policy instruments to encourage adoption of afforestation. Net private benefit is commonly negative, so much so, that in most cases no policy response is justified. However, in certain cases, net private benefits are slightly negative and public benefits are significantly positive justifying the use of positive incentives as the most appropriate policy instrument to encourage afforestation in New Zealand. The most commonly used policy instruments for afforestation in New Zealand, extension and awareness training, are found to be appropriate in only a minority of situations. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)135-145
JournalLand Use Policy
Volume39
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

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public benefits
afforestation
ecosystem service
ecosystem services
New Zealand
social benefit
economic model
policy analysis
land use
incentive
minority
econometric models
land use change
forest plantations
plantation
agricultural land
policy
economics
public
policy instrument

Cite this

Barry, L.E. ; Yao, R. ; Harrison, D.R. ; Paragahawewa, U.H. ; Pannell, David. / Enhancing ecosystem services through afforestation: How policy can help. In: Land Use Policy. 2014 ; Vol. 39. pp. 135-145.
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Enhancing ecosystem services through afforestation: How policy can help. / Barry, L.E.; Yao, R.; Harrison, D.R.; Paragahawewa, U.H.; Pannell, David.

In: Land Use Policy, Vol. 39, 2014, p. 135-145.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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