Energy-efficient low-Fresnel-number Bessel beams and their application in optical coherence tomography

Dirk Lorenser, C.C. Singe, Andrea Curatolo, David Sampson

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    53 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Bessel beams feature a very large depth-of-focus (DOF) compared to conventional focusing schemes, but their central lobe carries only a small fraction of the total beam power, leading to a strongly reduced peak irradiance. This is problematic for power-limited applications, such as optical coherence tomography (OCT) or optical coherence microscopy, as it can result in a prohibitive reduction of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Using scalar diffraction theory, we show that the trade-off between DOF and peak irradiance of Bessel beams depends solely on the Fresnel number N. We demonstrate the existence of a low-Fresnel-number regime,N <10, in which axicons with Gaussian illumination can generate energy-efficient Bessel beams with a small number of sidelobes. In the context of OCT, this translates into DOF enhancements of up to 13× for a SNR penalty below 20 dB, which is confirmed by our experiments. We expect that these findings will enable improved performance of optical systems with extended DOF. © 2014 Optical Society of America.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)548-551
    JournalOptics Letters
    Volume39
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2014

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    tomography
    irradiance
    signal to noise ratios
    energy
    sidelobes
    penalties
    lobes
    illumination
    scalars
    microscopy
    augmentation
    diffraction

    Cite this

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    title = "Energy-efficient low-Fresnel-number Bessel beams and their application in optical coherence tomography",
    abstract = "Bessel beams feature a very large depth-of-focus (DOF) compared to conventional focusing schemes, but their central lobe carries only a small fraction of the total beam power, leading to a strongly reduced peak irradiance. This is problematic for power-limited applications, such as optical coherence tomography (OCT) or optical coherence microscopy, as it can result in a prohibitive reduction of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Using scalar diffraction theory, we show that the trade-off between DOF and peak irradiance of Bessel beams depends solely on the Fresnel number N. We demonstrate the existence of a low-Fresnel-number regime,N <10, in which axicons with Gaussian illumination can generate energy-efficient Bessel beams with a small number of sidelobes. In the context of OCT, this translates into DOF enhancements of up to 13× for a SNR penalty below 20 dB, which is confirmed by our experiments. We expect that these findings will enable improved performance of optical systems with extended DOF. {\circledC} 2014 Optical Society of America.",
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    Energy-efficient low-Fresnel-number Bessel beams and their application in optical coherence tomography. / Lorenser, Dirk; Singe, C.C.; Curatolo, Andrea; Sampson, David.

    In: Optics Letters, Vol. 39, No. 3, 2014, p. 548-551.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Energy-efficient low-Fresnel-number Bessel beams and their application in optical coherence tomography

    AU - Lorenser, Dirk

    AU - Singe, C.C.

    AU - Curatolo, Andrea

    AU - Sampson, David

    PY - 2014

    Y1 - 2014

    N2 - Bessel beams feature a very large depth-of-focus (DOF) compared to conventional focusing schemes, but their central lobe carries only a small fraction of the total beam power, leading to a strongly reduced peak irradiance. This is problematic for power-limited applications, such as optical coherence tomography (OCT) or optical coherence microscopy, as it can result in a prohibitive reduction of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Using scalar diffraction theory, we show that the trade-off between DOF and peak irradiance of Bessel beams depends solely on the Fresnel number N. We demonstrate the existence of a low-Fresnel-number regime,N <10, in which axicons with Gaussian illumination can generate energy-efficient Bessel beams with a small number of sidelobes. In the context of OCT, this translates into DOF enhancements of up to 13× for a SNR penalty below 20 dB, which is confirmed by our experiments. We expect that these findings will enable improved performance of optical systems with extended DOF. © 2014 Optical Society of America.

    AB - Bessel beams feature a very large depth-of-focus (DOF) compared to conventional focusing schemes, but their central lobe carries only a small fraction of the total beam power, leading to a strongly reduced peak irradiance. This is problematic for power-limited applications, such as optical coherence tomography (OCT) or optical coherence microscopy, as it can result in a prohibitive reduction of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Using scalar diffraction theory, we show that the trade-off between DOF and peak irradiance of Bessel beams depends solely on the Fresnel number N. We demonstrate the existence of a low-Fresnel-number regime,N <10, in which axicons with Gaussian illumination can generate energy-efficient Bessel beams with a small number of sidelobes. In the context of OCT, this translates into DOF enhancements of up to 13× for a SNR penalty below 20 dB, which is confirmed by our experiments. We expect that these findings will enable improved performance of optical systems with extended DOF. © 2014 Optical Society of America.

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