Efficiency of different irrigation systems for sustainable management of water and nutrient flows in the Harvey irrigation area

Ainalem Nega

    Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

    2962 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    [Truncated abstract] Sustainable management of water resources and the mitigation of nutrient flows into the Peel Harvey inlet from irrigated farmland can be achieved through a combination of land management practice and the implementation of efficient irrigation systems. A quantitative understanding of efficiency for individual irrigation systems is required to determine the efficacy of system employed to grow crops or pastures and improve water resource and delivery management. An improved understanding is gained through the evaluation of design and water application methodologies utilized in the Harvey Irrigation District in Western Australia. Various irrigation system performance measures are used to evaluate and compare the irrigation systems. Soil moisture measurements over a 60 mm depth were taken before and after irrigation for each application system to determine the temporal and spatial variability of soil moisture within the study area. The four irrigation systems (floppy, solid set, center pivot and subsurface drip) used in the Harvey Irrigation District were compared using efficiency and uniformity criteria. Soil moisture measurements were taken at the Waroona Research Station for each irrigation system before and after the irrigation cycle, over 60 mm depth using a thetraprobe.
    Original languageEnglish
    QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
    Publication statusUnpublished - 2011

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