EFFECTS OF solUTION: SOIL RATIO AND VIGOUR OF SHAKING ON THE RATE OF PHOSPHATE ADSORPTION BY SOIL

N. J. BARROW, T. C. SHAW

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

The effects were measured of varying the solution: soil ratio, and the vigour of shaking on the rate of adsorption of phosphate. One soil appeared to break down with vigorous shaking, prior to adding phosphate, especially at low solution: soil ratio. As a result, subsequent phosphate adsorption was faster. With gentle shaking, there was no effect of solution: soil ratio with the soil. Another soil was more stable and there were only small differences due to vigour of shaking and no effect of solution: soil ratio with any method of shaking. The change in phosphate concentration was not proportional to the reciprocal of time as reported by Ryden and Syers (1975) and Hope and Syers (1976). Hence the validity of extrapolating from short sections of reciprocal‐time graphs in order to estimate equilibrium is questioned.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)67-76
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Soil Science
Volume30
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 1979

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vigor
soil solution
Adsorption
adsorption
Soil
Phosphates
phosphate
phosphates
soil
rate
methodology
effect

Cite this

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title = "EFFECTS OF solUTION: SOIL RATIO AND VIGOUR OF SHAKING ON THE RATE OF PHOSPHATE ADSORPTION BY SOIL",
abstract = "The effects were measured of varying the solution: soil ratio, and the vigour of shaking on the rate of adsorption of phosphate. One soil appeared to break down with vigorous shaking, prior to adding phosphate, especially at low solution: soil ratio. As a result, subsequent phosphate adsorption was faster. With gentle shaking, there was no effect of solution: soil ratio with the soil. Another soil was more stable and there were only small differences due to vigour of shaking and no effect of solution: soil ratio with any method of shaking. The change in phosphate concentration was not proportional to the reciprocal of time as reported by Ryden and Syers (1975) and Hope and Syers (1976). Hence the validity of extrapolating from short sections of reciprocal‐time graphs in order to estimate equilibrium is questioned.",
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EFFECTS OF solUTION : SOIL RATIO AND VIGOUR OF SHAKING ON THE RATE OF PHOSPHATE ADSORPTION BY SOIL. / BARROW, N. J.; SHAW, T. C.

In: Journal of Soil Science, Vol. 30, No. 1, 01.01.1979, p. 67-76.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AB - The effects were measured of varying the solution: soil ratio, and the vigour of shaking on the rate of adsorption of phosphate. One soil appeared to break down with vigorous shaking, prior to adding phosphate, especially at low solution: soil ratio. As a result, subsequent phosphate adsorption was faster. With gentle shaking, there was no effect of solution: soil ratio with the soil. Another soil was more stable and there were only small differences due to vigour of shaking and no effect of solution: soil ratio with any method of shaking. The change in phosphate concentration was not proportional to the reciprocal of time as reported by Ryden and Syers (1975) and Hope and Syers (1976). Hence the validity of extrapolating from short sections of reciprocal‐time graphs in order to estimate equilibrium is questioned.

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