Effects of cereal borders, admixture with cereals and plant density on the spread of bean yellow mosaic potyvirus into narrow‐leafed lupins (Lupinus angustifolius)

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Abstract

In studies of virus control measures, field experiments in 1987–1991 investigated the effects of cereal and fallow borders, admixture with cereals and plant density on spread of bean yellow mosaic potyvirus (BYMV) from pastures dominated by subterranean clover (Trifolium subterraneum) into plots of narrow‐leafed lupins (Lupinus angustifolius). Virus spread was mainly monocyclic because BYMV killed infected lupin plants and between systemic movement and death there was only a brief period for BYMV acquisition and transmission to other plants by vector aphids. In plots with cereal borders, the rate and extent of BYMV spread into the lupins was decreased; at final assessment the numbers of infected plants were 43–60% less than in plots with fallow borders. Admixture with cereals also decreased the rate and extent of BYMV spread into lupin plots, numbers of infected plants being decreased by 76–96% at the time of final assessment. When lupins were sown at different seeding rates to generate a range of plant densities and weeds were removed, high densities decreased BYMV infection. The higher incidences of BYMV infection in sparse stands were attributed partly to smaller plant numbers and partly to incoming viruliferous vector aphids being more attracted to plants with bare earth around them, than to a plant canopy. BYMV infection decreased grain yield of samples from infected lupin plants by 94–100%. In plots with 34% infection and sparse stands, grain yield was decreased by about one third. Plotted progress curves for the accumulated numbers of alate aphids of the BYMV vector species Acyrthosiphon kondoi and Myzus persicae resembled those for numbers of BYMV infected plants in 1990, but in 1991 only the curve plotted for M. persicae did so. There was a 2 week delay between the curves for aphid numbers and virus counts which reflected the time taken for obvious systemic necrotic symptoms to develop in lupins.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)501-518
Number of pages18
JournalAnnals of Applied Biology
Volume122
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1993
Externally publishedYes

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