Effects of black tea on body composition and metabolic outcomes related to cardiovascular disease risk: A randomized controlled trial

S.K. Bøhn, Kevin Croft, Sally Burrows, Ian Puddey, T.P.J. Mulder, D.M.S. Fuchs, R.J. Woodman, Jonathan Hodgson

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    23 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    There is increasing evidence that tea and its non-caffeine components (primarily flavonoids) contribute to cardiovascular health. Randomized controlled trials have shown that tea can improve cardiovascular disease risk factors. We have previously reported a non-caffeine associated beneficial effect of regular black tea consumption on blood pressure and its variation. Objective: To explore the non-caffeine associated effects of black tea on body weight and body fat distribution, and cardiovascular disease related metabolic outcomes. Design: regular tea-drinking men and women (n = 111; BMI 20-35 kg m-2) were recruited to a randomized controlled double-blind 6 month parallel-designed trial. Participants consumed 3 cups per day of either powdered black tea solids (tea) or a flavonoid-free flavour- and caffeine-matched placebo (control). Body weight, waist- and hip-circumference, endothelial function and plasma biomarkers were assessed at baseline, 3 months and 6 months. Results: Compared to control, regular ingestion of black tea over 3 months inhibited weight gain (-0.64 kg, p = 0.047) and reduced waist circumference (-1.88 cm, P = 0.035) and waist-to-hip ratio (-0.03, P = 0.005). These effects were no longer significant at 6 months. There were no significant effects observed on fasting glucose, insulin, plasma lipids or endothelial function. Conclusion: Our study suggests that short-term regular ingestion of black tea over 3 months can improve body weight and body fat distribution, compared to a caffeine-matched control beverage. However, there was no evidence that these effects were sustained beyond 3 months. This journal is © the Partner Organisations 2014.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1613-1620
    JournalFood and Function
    Volume5
    Issue number7
    Early online date12 May 2014
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jul 2014

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