Effect of Viral Adaptation and T Cell Receptor Usage on Natural and Vaccine-Induced Cellular Immunity

Jennifer Currenti

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

108 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Viral infections incur a significant burden on humans and can persist for the lifespan of those infected. Consequently, there is a need to understand host-viral interactions to inform vaccine design. This Thesis focused on two viruses, influenza virus and human immunodeficiency virus, and explored the implications of host-viral interactions on vaccine design. The results of this Thesis provide an in-depth understanding of host-viral interactions, particularly in the context of viral adaptation and its impact on the anti-viral immune response. These findings are important for vaccine design and the ability to develop high efficacy vaccines for several mutable viral pathogens.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
Awarding Institution
  • The University of Western Australia
Supervisors/Advisors
  • Gaudieri, Silvana, Supervisor
  • Kalams, Spyros A., Supervisor, External person
  • Chopra, Abha, Supervisor, External person
  • John, Mina, Supervisor
  • Lucas, Michaela, Supervisor
Thesis sponsors
Award date10 Jan 2022
DOIs
Publication statusUnpublished - 2021

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