Effect of previous additions of phosphate on phosphate adsorption by soils

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

83 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Phosphate, at several levels of application, was incubated with four soils for 12 months at 25°C or was left in contact with soil in the field for three years. The capacity of the soils to adsorb further phosphate and the proportion of the phosphate remaining isotopically exchangeable were then measured. Previous additions of phosphate reduced the capacity of the soils to adsorb further phosphate. Not only were the adsorption curves displaced but they were also of lower slope; that is, the buffering capacity for phosphate was decreased. Only a small proportion of the previously added phosphate remained isotopically exchangeable within 24 hr. The results indicated that some of the phosphate had been converted into a form which was occupying phosphate adsorption sites, blocking them from further reaction, and thus reducing the buffering capacity for phosphate. The reduction was not linearly related to level of application. Low levels of application produced a proportionately larger effect than high levels.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)82-89
Number of pages8
JournalSoil Science
Volume118
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 1974
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

adsorption
phosphate
phosphates
soil
buffering capacity
buffering
effect

Cite this

@article{1d575f3b3faa40228a21c3241c615297,
title = "Effect of previous additions of phosphate on phosphate adsorption by soils",
abstract = "Phosphate, at several levels of application, was incubated with four soils for 12 months at 25°C or was left in contact with soil in the field for three years. The capacity of the soils to adsorb further phosphate and the proportion of the phosphate remaining isotopically exchangeable were then measured. Previous additions of phosphate reduced the capacity of the soils to adsorb further phosphate. Not only were the adsorption curves displaced but they were also of lower slope; that is, the buffering capacity for phosphate was decreased. Only a small proportion of the previously added phosphate remained isotopically exchangeable within 24 hr. The results indicated that some of the phosphate had been converted into a form which was occupying phosphate adsorption sites, blocking them from further reaction, and thus reducing the buffering capacity for phosphate. The reduction was not linearly related to level of application. Low levels of application produced a proportionately larger effect than high levels.",
author = "Barrow, {N. J.}",
year = "1974",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1097/00010694-197408000-00004",
language = "English",
volume = "118",
pages = "82--89",
journal = "Soil Science",
issn = "0038-075X",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams & Wilkins",
number = "2",

}

Effect of previous additions of phosphate on phosphate adsorption by soils. / Barrow, N. J.

In: Soil Science, Vol. 118, No. 2, 01.01.1974, p. 82-89.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effect of previous additions of phosphate on phosphate adsorption by soils

AU - Barrow, N. J.

PY - 1974/1/1

Y1 - 1974/1/1

N2 - Phosphate, at several levels of application, was incubated with four soils for 12 months at 25°C or was left in contact with soil in the field for three years. The capacity of the soils to adsorb further phosphate and the proportion of the phosphate remaining isotopically exchangeable were then measured. Previous additions of phosphate reduced the capacity of the soils to adsorb further phosphate. Not only were the adsorption curves displaced but they were also of lower slope; that is, the buffering capacity for phosphate was decreased. Only a small proportion of the previously added phosphate remained isotopically exchangeable within 24 hr. The results indicated that some of the phosphate had been converted into a form which was occupying phosphate adsorption sites, blocking them from further reaction, and thus reducing the buffering capacity for phosphate. The reduction was not linearly related to level of application. Low levels of application produced a proportionately larger effect than high levels.

AB - Phosphate, at several levels of application, was incubated with four soils for 12 months at 25°C or was left in contact with soil in the field for three years. The capacity of the soils to adsorb further phosphate and the proportion of the phosphate remaining isotopically exchangeable were then measured. Previous additions of phosphate reduced the capacity of the soils to adsorb further phosphate. Not only were the adsorption curves displaced but they were also of lower slope; that is, the buffering capacity for phosphate was decreased. Only a small proportion of the previously added phosphate remained isotopically exchangeable within 24 hr. The results indicated that some of the phosphate had been converted into a form which was occupying phosphate adsorption sites, blocking them from further reaction, and thus reducing the buffering capacity for phosphate. The reduction was not linearly related to level of application. Low levels of application produced a proportionately larger effect than high levels.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84934727921&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/00010694-197408000-00004

DO - 10.1097/00010694-197408000-00004

M3 - Article

VL - 118

SP - 82

EP - 89

JO - Soil Science

JF - Soil Science

SN - 0038-075X

IS - 2

ER -