Effect of Composts, Lime and Diammonium Phosphate on the Phytoavailability of Heavy Metals in a Copper Mine Tailing Soil

M. J. Khan, D. L. Jones

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

61 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Soil samples from a historic copper mine tailing site at the Parys Mountain, North Wales (UK) were amended with green waste compost (GC), GC+30% sewage sludge (GCS), lime and diammonium phosphate (DAP), to determine the effect of amendments on DTPA- and Ca(NO3)2-extractable metals in the mine tailing and on the phytoavailability of heavy metals by a lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.). Both compost were added at the rate of 10% by weight, lime was added as calcium carbonate equivalent (pH = 7) and DAP at a 2 300 mg kg-1 soil level. The experiment was arranged in randomised complete design with three replicates in pots under control environment. Addition of lime resulted in the largest reduction in metal extractability with DTPA and Ca(NO3)2 and phytoavailability of Cu, Fe and Zn while DAP was effective in lowering Pb extractability and phytoavailability. With exception of Zn, all other metals extracted decreased with time after amendment applications. The distribution of heavy metals between and within the four procedures of potentially bioavailable sequential extraction (PBASE) varied significantly (P < 0.001). Stronger relationships were noted between the metals extracted with PBASE SE1 and Cu, Pb (P < 0.01) and Fe (P < 0.001) in the lettuce. These results indicate that addition of lime is sufficient to restore the vegetative cover to a high metal mine waste while DAP is good for stabilizing Pb, but its detrimental role on plant growth and the risk associated with presence of N in DAP (through N leaching) may restrict its chances for remediation of contaminated sites.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)631-641
Number of pages11
JournalPedosphere
Volume19
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2009
Externally publishedYes

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