Effect of combining pre-exercise carbohydrate intake and repeated short sprints on the blood glucose response to moderate-intensity exercise in young individuals with Type 1 diabetes

W. H.K. Soon, K. J. Guelfi, E. A. Davis, G. J. Smith, T. W. Jones, P. A. Fournier

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Aims: To determine whether pre-exercise ingestion of carbohydrates to maintain stable glycaemia during moderate-intensity exercise results in excessive hyperglycaemia if combined with repeated sprints in individuals with Type 1 diabetes. Methods: Eight overnight-fasted people with Type 1 diabetes completed the following four 40-min exercise sessions on separate days in a randomized counterbalanced order under basal insulinaemic conditions: continuous moderate-intensity exercise at 50% (Formula presented.) peak; intermittent high-intensity exercise (moderate-intensity exercise interspersed with 4-s sprints every 2 min and a final 10-s sprint); continuous moderate-intensity exercise with prior carbohydrate intake (~10 g per person); and intermittent high-intensity exercise with prior carbohydrate intake. Venous blood was sampled during and 2 h after exercise to measure glucose and lactate levels. Results: The difference in marginal mean time-averaged area under the blood glucose curve between continuous moderate-intensity exercise + prior carbohydrate and intermittent high-intensity exercise + prior carbohydrate during exercise and recovery was not significant [0.2 mmol/l (95% CI –0.7, 1.1); P = 0.635], nor was the difference in peak blood glucose level after adjusting for baseline level [0.2 mmol/l (95% CI –0.7, 1.1); P = 0.695]. The difference in marginal mean time-averaged area under the blood glucose curve between continuous moderate-intensity and intermittent high-intensity exercise during exercise and recovery was also not significant [–0.2 mmol/l (95% CI –1.2, 0.8); P = 0.651]. Conclusions: When carbohydrates are ingested prior to moderate-intensity exercise, adding repeated sprints is not significantly detrimental to glycaemic management in overnight fasted people with Type 1 diabetes under basal insulin conditions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)612-619
Number of pages8
JournalDiabetic Medicine
Volume36
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 May 2019

Fingerprint

Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
Blood Glucose
Carbohydrates
Hyperglycemia
Lactic Acid
Eating
Insulin
Glucose
High-Intensity Interval Training

Cite this

@article{ceec569c5aec4877b89844778855aa09,
title = "Effect of combining pre-exercise carbohydrate intake and repeated short sprints on the blood glucose response to moderate-intensity exercise in young individuals with Type 1 diabetes",
abstract = "Aims: To determine whether pre-exercise ingestion of carbohydrates to maintain stable glycaemia during moderate-intensity exercise results in excessive hyperglycaemia if combined with repeated sprints in individuals with Type 1 diabetes. Methods: Eight overnight-fasted people with Type 1 diabetes completed the following four 40-min exercise sessions on separate days in a randomized counterbalanced order under basal insulinaemic conditions: continuous moderate-intensity exercise at 50{\%} (Formula presented.) peak; intermittent high-intensity exercise (moderate-intensity exercise interspersed with 4-s sprints every 2 min and a final 10-s sprint); continuous moderate-intensity exercise with prior carbohydrate intake (~10 g per person); and intermittent high-intensity exercise with prior carbohydrate intake. Venous blood was sampled during and 2 h after exercise to measure glucose and lactate levels. Results: The difference in marginal mean time-averaged area under the blood glucose curve between continuous moderate-intensity exercise + prior carbohydrate and intermittent high-intensity exercise + prior carbohydrate during exercise and recovery was not significant [0.2 mmol/l (95{\%} CI –0.7, 1.1); P = 0.635], nor was the difference in peak blood glucose level after adjusting for baseline level [0.2 mmol/l (95{\%} CI –0.7, 1.1); P = 0.695]. The difference in marginal mean time-averaged area under the blood glucose curve between continuous moderate-intensity and intermittent high-intensity exercise during exercise and recovery was also not significant [–0.2 mmol/l (95{\%} CI –1.2, 0.8); P = 0.651]. Conclusions: When carbohydrates are ingested prior to moderate-intensity exercise, adding repeated sprints is not significantly detrimental to glycaemic management in overnight fasted people with Type 1 diabetes under basal insulin conditions.",
author = "Soon, {W. H.K.} and Guelfi, {K. J.} and Davis, {E. A.} and Smith, {G. J.} and Jones, {T. W.} and Fournier, {P. A.}",
year = "2019",
month = "5",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/dme.13914",
language = "English",
volume = "36",
pages = "612--619",
journal = "Diabetic Medicine: journal of diabetes UK",
issn = "0742-3071",
publisher = "John Wiley & Sons",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effect of combining pre-exercise carbohydrate intake and repeated short sprints on the blood glucose response to moderate-intensity exercise in young individuals with Type 1 diabetes

AU - Soon, W. H.K.

AU - Guelfi, K. J.

AU - Davis, E. A.

AU - Smith, G. J.

AU - Jones, T. W.

AU - Fournier, P. A.

PY - 2019/5/1

Y1 - 2019/5/1

N2 - Aims: To determine whether pre-exercise ingestion of carbohydrates to maintain stable glycaemia during moderate-intensity exercise results in excessive hyperglycaemia if combined with repeated sprints in individuals with Type 1 diabetes. Methods: Eight overnight-fasted people with Type 1 diabetes completed the following four 40-min exercise sessions on separate days in a randomized counterbalanced order under basal insulinaemic conditions: continuous moderate-intensity exercise at 50% (Formula presented.) peak; intermittent high-intensity exercise (moderate-intensity exercise interspersed with 4-s sprints every 2 min and a final 10-s sprint); continuous moderate-intensity exercise with prior carbohydrate intake (~10 g per person); and intermittent high-intensity exercise with prior carbohydrate intake. Venous blood was sampled during and 2 h after exercise to measure glucose and lactate levels. Results: The difference in marginal mean time-averaged area under the blood glucose curve between continuous moderate-intensity exercise + prior carbohydrate and intermittent high-intensity exercise + prior carbohydrate during exercise and recovery was not significant [0.2 mmol/l (95% CI –0.7, 1.1); P = 0.635], nor was the difference in peak blood glucose level after adjusting for baseline level [0.2 mmol/l (95% CI –0.7, 1.1); P = 0.695]. The difference in marginal mean time-averaged area under the blood glucose curve between continuous moderate-intensity and intermittent high-intensity exercise during exercise and recovery was also not significant [–0.2 mmol/l (95% CI –1.2, 0.8); P = 0.651]. Conclusions: When carbohydrates are ingested prior to moderate-intensity exercise, adding repeated sprints is not significantly detrimental to glycaemic management in overnight fasted people with Type 1 diabetes under basal insulin conditions.

AB - Aims: To determine whether pre-exercise ingestion of carbohydrates to maintain stable glycaemia during moderate-intensity exercise results in excessive hyperglycaemia if combined with repeated sprints in individuals with Type 1 diabetes. Methods: Eight overnight-fasted people with Type 1 diabetes completed the following four 40-min exercise sessions on separate days in a randomized counterbalanced order under basal insulinaemic conditions: continuous moderate-intensity exercise at 50% (Formula presented.) peak; intermittent high-intensity exercise (moderate-intensity exercise interspersed with 4-s sprints every 2 min and a final 10-s sprint); continuous moderate-intensity exercise with prior carbohydrate intake (~10 g per person); and intermittent high-intensity exercise with prior carbohydrate intake. Venous blood was sampled during and 2 h after exercise to measure glucose and lactate levels. Results: The difference in marginal mean time-averaged area under the blood glucose curve between continuous moderate-intensity exercise + prior carbohydrate and intermittent high-intensity exercise + prior carbohydrate during exercise and recovery was not significant [0.2 mmol/l (95% CI –0.7, 1.1); P = 0.635], nor was the difference in peak blood glucose level after adjusting for baseline level [0.2 mmol/l (95% CI –0.7, 1.1); P = 0.695]. The difference in marginal mean time-averaged area under the blood glucose curve between continuous moderate-intensity and intermittent high-intensity exercise during exercise and recovery was also not significant [–0.2 mmol/l (95% CI –1.2, 0.8); P = 0.651]. Conclusions: When carbohydrates are ingested prior to moderate-intensity exercise, adding repeated sprints is not significantly detrimental to glycaemic management in overnight fasted people with Type 1 diabetes under basal insulin conditions.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85061624293&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/dme.13914

DO - 10.1111/dme.13914

M3 - Article

VL - 36

SP - 612

EP - 619

JO - Diabetic Medicine: journal of diabetes UK

JF - Diabetic Medicine: journal of diabetes UK

SN - 0742-3071

IS - 5

ER -