Effect of a high-egg diet on cardiometabolic risk factors in people with type 2 diabetes: The Diabetes and Egg (DIABEGG) Study - Randomized weight-loss and follow-up phase

Nicholas R. Fuller, Amanda Sainsbury, Ian D. Caterson, Gareth Denyer, Mackenzie Fong, James Gerofi, Chloris Leung, Namson S. Lau, Kathryn H. Williams, Andrzej S. Januszewski, Alicia J. Jenkins, Tania P. Markovic

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background Some country guidelines recommend that people with type 2 diabetes (T2D) limit their consumption of eggs and cholesterol. Our previously published 3-mo weight-maintenance study showed that a high-egg (≥12 eggs/wk) diet compared with a low-egg diet (<2 eggs/wk) did not have adverse effects on cardiometabolic risk factors in adults with T2D. Objective The current study follows the previously published 3-mo weight-maintenance study and assessed the effects of the high-egg compared with the low-egg diets as part of a 3-mo weight-loss period, followed by a 6-mo follow-up period for a total duration of 12 mo. Design Participants with prediabetes or T2D (n = 128) were prescribed a 3-mo daily energy restriction of 2.1 MJ and a macronutrient-matched diet and instructed on specific types and quantities of foods to be consumed, with an emphasis on replacing saturated fats with monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats. Participants were followed up at the 9- and 12-mo visits. Results From 3 to 12 mo, the weight loss was similar (high-egg compared with low-egg diets: -3.1 ± 6.3 compared with -3.1 ± 5.2 kg; P = 0.48). There were no differences between groups in glycemia (plasma glucose, glycated hemoglobin, 1,5-anhydroglucitol), traditional serum lipids, markers of inflammation (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, interleukin 6, soluble E-selectin), oxidative stress (F2-isoprostanes), or adiponectin from 3 to 12 mo or from 0 to 12 mo. Conclusions People with prediabetes or T2D who consumed a 3-mo high-egg weight-loss diet with a 6-mo follow-up exhibited no adverse changes in cardiometabolic markers compared with those who consumed a low-egg weight-loss diet. A healthy diet based on population guidelines and including more eggs than currently recommended by some countries may be safely consumed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)921-931
Number of pages11
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume107
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2018
Externally publishedYes

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