Ebooks down under

Tony Davies, Michelle Morgan

Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference paperConference paper

Abstract

Australian libraries have been early adopters of groundbreaking ebook initiatives for the past 10 years, helping to build and shape some of the innovative models and tools we use today. There has been a significant shift to e-preferred collection policies and ebook acquisition programs (including Demand-Driven Acquisition (DDA)) are generally substantially larger and more established in Australia than North America. In 2006, Swinburne was the first ever library to load the full EBL catalog into its library OPAC and make all titles available for immediate access using EBL's DDA model. Evidence from University of Western Australia shows that DDA is more effective in selecting relevant material for the collection. As a result, UWA is currently implementing an e-preferred strategy across all monographic acquisition processes. This presentation will present and discuss studies from two institutions that have shaped ebook collections in Australia, and look back at the bold beginnings of Demand-driven Acquisition and to where Australia is now - where a markedly more established ebook purchasing market exists.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of 'Too Much Is Not Enough!', the 33rd Annual Charleston Conference
Subtitle of host publicationIssues in Book and Serial Acquisition
Place of PublicationCharleston, South Carolina, United States
PublisherPurdue University
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2013
Event33rd Annual Charleston Conference - Purdue, United States
Duration: 1 Jan 20131 Jan 2013

Conference

Conference33rd Annual Charleston Conference
CountryUnited States
CityPurdue
Period1/01/131/01/13

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  • Cite this

    Davies, T., & Morgan, M. (2013). Ebooks down under. In Proceedings of 'Too Much Is Not Enough!', the 33rd Annual Charleston Conference: Issues in Book and Serial Acquisition Purdue University. https://doi.org/10.5703/1288284315253