Early changes in 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure are associated with high normal albumin excretion rate in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus

P.H. Gallego, A.J. Gilbey, M.T. Grant, Mahesh Bulsara, G.C. Byrne, Timothy Jones, F.L. Frazer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The relationship between urinary albumin excretion rate (AER) and elevated blood pressure (BP) is unclear as a cause-effect phenomenon in the development of diabetic nephropathy. The aim of this study was to examine the association between AER, HbAlc and BP in children with normoalbuminuria.Methods: 24-hour ambulatory BP assessment was performed in 78 children with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM1), age mean SD 13.4 +/- 2.7 yr, range 7.3-18.3 yr, DM1 duration mean SD 6.6 +/- 2.9 yr, range 2.1-11.9 yr. Using generalised linear mixed models with systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressure as dependent variables, the effects of AER and HbAlc were examined, adjusting for age, gender, DM1 duration and insulin dose.Results: Patients with high normal AER (7-20 mu g/min) had higher SBP during daytime and night-time compared to the low normal AER (<= 7 mu g/min) (mean +/- SD 118.20 +/- 7.98 and 110.33 +/- 7.08 mm Hg, p = 0.02; mean +/- SD 108.76 +/- 9.21 and 100.20 +/- 7.75 mm Hg, p = 0.03, respectively). DBP was also higher both during day-and night-time when compared to the <= 7 mu g/min group (mean SD 73.40 +/- 6.50 and 64.86 +/- 5.67 mm Hg,p = 0.002; mean SD 62.50 +/- 6.75 and 56.30 +/- 5.56 mm Hg, p = 0.03 day- and night-time, respectively).Conclusion: A rise in SBP and DBP is associated with increased levels of AER even within the normal range.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)879-885
JournalJournal of Pediatric Endocrinology & Metabolism
Volume18
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Early changes in 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure are associated with high normal albumin excretion rate in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this