Dynamics of the Swan River estuary: an environmental assessment

Rohan Wilathgamuwa Stephens

    Research output: ThesisMaster's Thesis

    6 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    The Swan River is a south-west Australian estuary which undergoes a distinct seasonal stratification cycle. The bottom topography of the estuary is dominated by two sills; a relatively deep basin separates a shallow (5m) sill close to the ocean entrance and a shallower (2m) secondary sill situated adjacent to the city of Perth. Due to the ever increasing nutrient loading of the system, algal blooms are being experienced. An intensive investigation into the hydrodynamics of the estuary was thus performed with the aim of understanding the physical processes which occur. The seasonal variability of the stratification has been documented with regular C-T-D-DO transects which were used to piece together an overview of the dynamics. The estuarine dynamics were classified into a gravitational overflow produced by the winter rains, a salt wedge condition governed by both discharge and topographic constraints, tidal dynamics which influences the degree of flushing, and the roles of the sills which control fluid exchange between the estuary and the ocean and control the propagation of the salt wedge and the gravitational overflow. The dynamics of the deep basin were documented in greater detail during intensive summer and winter experiments. Abroad variety of internal features including lee waves, undular bores, and basin scale seiching were observed over a tidal cycle. A one-dimensional, three layered analytical model was constructed to predict the basin response.
    Original languageEnglish
    QualificationMasters
    Awarding Institution
    • The University of Western Australia
    DOIs
    Publication statusUnpublished - 1994

    Fingerprint

    environmental assessment
    sill
    estuary
    basin
    river
    stratification
    estuarine dynamics
    salt
    lee wave
    bottom topography
    winter
    tidal cycle
    ocean
    flushing
    algal bloom
    transect
    hydrodynamics
    fluid
    nutrient
    summer

    Bibliographical note

    This thesis has been made available in the UWA Profiles and Research Repository as part of a UWA Library project to digitise and make available theses completed before 2003. If you are the author of this thesis and would like it removed from the UWA Profiles and Research Repository, please contact digitaltheses-lib@uwa.edu.au

    Cite this

    @phdthesis{8a31b10c65bd4de49febe172fd13e8fa,
    title = "Dynamics of the Swan River estuary: an environmental assessment",
    abstract = "The Swan River is a south-west Australian estuary which undergoes a distinct seasonal stratification cycle. The bottom topography of the estuary is dominated by two sills; a relatively deep basin separates a shallow (5m) sill close to the ocean entrance and a shallower (2m) secondary sill situated adjacent to the city of Perth. Due to the ever increasing nutrient loading of the system, algal blooms are being experienced. An intensive investigation into the hydrodynamics of the estuary was thus performed with the aim of understanding the physical processes which occur. The seasonal variability of the stratification has been documented with regular C-T-D-DO transects which were used to piece together an overview of the dynamics. The estuarine dynamics were classified into a gravitational overflow produced by the winter rains, a salt wedge condition governed by both discharge and topographic constraints, tidal dynamics which influences the degree of flushing, and the roles of the sills which control fluid exchange between the estuary and the ocean and control the propagation of the salt wedge and the gravitational overflow. The dynamics of the deep basin were documented in greater detail during intensive summer and winter experiments. Abroad variety of internal features including lee waves, undular bores, and basin scale seiching were observed over a tidal cycle. A one-dimensional, three layered analytical model was constructed to predict the basin response.",
    author = "Stephens, {Rohan Wilathgamuwa}",
    note = "This thesis has been made available in the UWA Profiles and Research Repository as part of a UWA Library project to digitise and make available theses completed before 2003. If you are the author of this thesis and would like it removed from the UWA Profiles and Research Repository, please contact digitaltheses-lib@uwa.edu.au",
    year = "1994",
    doi = "10.26182/5c89eed0789f5",
    language = "English",
    school = "The University of Western Australia",

    }

    Stephens, RW 1994, 'Dynamics of the Swan River estuary: an environmental assessment', Masters, The University of Western Australia. https://doi.org/10.26182/5c89eed0789f5

    Dynamics of the Swan River estuary: an environmental assessment. / Stephens, Rohan Wilathgamuwa.

    1994.

    Research output: ThesisMaster's Thesis

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    T1 - Dynamics of the Swan River estuary: an environmental assessment

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    N1 - This thesis has been made available in the UWA Profiles and Research Repository as part of a UWA Library project to digitise and make available theses completed before 2003. If you are the author of this thesis and would like it removed from the UWA Profiles and Research Repository, please contact digitaltheses-lib@uwa.edu.au

    PY - 1994

    Y1 - 1994

    N2 - The Swan River is a south-west Australian estuary which undergoes a distinct seasonal stratification cycle. The bottom topography of the estuary is dominated by two sills; a relatively deep basin separates a shallow (5m) sill close to the ocean entrance and a shallower (2m) secondary sill situated adjacent to the city of Perth. Due to the ever increasing nutrient loading of the system, algal blooms are being experienced. An intensive investigation into the hydrodynamics of the estuary was thus performed with the aim of understanding the physical processes which occur. The seasonal variability of the stratification has been documented with regular C-T-D-DO transects which were used to piece together an overview of the dynamics. The estuarine dynamics were classified into a gravitational overflow produced by the winter rains, a salt wedge condition governed by both discharge and topographic constraints, tidal dynamics which influences the degree of flushing, and the roles of the sills which control fluid exchange between the estuary and the ocean and control the propagation of the salt wedge and the gravitational overflow. The dynamics of the deep basin were documented in greater detail during intensive summer and winter experiments. Abroad variety of internal features including lee waves, undular bores, and basin scale seiching were observed over a tidal cycle. A one-dimensional, three layered analytical model was constructed to predict the basin response.

    AB - The Swan River is a south-west Australian estuary which undergoes a distinct seasonal stratification cycle. The bottom topography of the estuary is dominated by two sills; a relatively deep basin separates a shallow (5m) sill close to the ocean entrance and a shallower (2m) secondary sill situated adjacent to the city of Perth. Due to the ever increasing nutrient loading of the system, algal blooms are being experienced. An intensive investigation into the hydrodynamics of the estuary was thus performed with the aim of understanding the physical processes which occur. The seasonal variability of the stratification has been documented with regular C-T-D-DO transects which were used to piece together an overview of the dynamics. The estuarine dynamics were classified into a gravitational overflow produced by the winter rains, a salt wedge condition governed by both discharge and topographic constraints, tidal dynamics which influences the degree of flushing, and the roles of the sills which control fluid exchange between the estuary and the ocean and control the propagation of the salt wedge and the gravitational overflow. The dynamics of the deep basin were documented in greater detail during intensive summer and winter experiments. Abroad variety of internal features including lee waves, undular bores, and basin scale seiching were observed over a tidal cycle. A one-dimensional, three layered analytical model was constructed to predict the basin response.

    U2 - 10.26182/5c89eed0789f5

    DO - 10.26182/5c89eed0789f5

    M3 - Master's Thesis

    ER -