Dynamic mixture measurements of commercial adsorbents for evaluating N2 + CH4 separations by pressure swing adsorption for liquefied natural gas production

Paul Hofman

    Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

    769 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    [Truncated] The demand for liquefied natural gas (LNG) is forecast to grow substantially over the next three to four decades, particularly in the Asia‐Pacific region. Impurities such as nitrogen in the natural gas feedstock used to produce LNG, pose a significant challenge to its efficient production, especially as high‐quality natural gas fields are depleted and sub‐quality gas needs to be utilised. Nitrogen is one of the most challenging contaminants to remove from unrefined natural gas because its inert properties make it difficult to separate from methane dominant gas streams.
    A review of the current state of commercial N2 + CH4 separation technologies, with respect to LNG production, showed that although a small number of these technologies exist and are frequently used in LNG production, there are a number of specific opportunities for improvement. Pressure swing adsorption (PSA) was proposed as a technology that could improve N2 + CH4 separations in LNG production by utilising the low temperatures available in an LNG facility. The primary motivation for the research in this thesis is the improvement of LNG production efficiency through enhanced N2 + CH4 separations using low temperature PSA.
    A dynamic column breakthrough apparatus was designed, constructed, and commissioned. This apparatus was capable of sorption measurements of multi‐component mixtures with high adsorbate concentrations at temperatures from 190 to 498 K and pressures to 1000 kPa. The apparatus is not limited to the study of dilute adsorbates within inert carrier gases because the design and instrumentation allows the flow rate and composition of effluent mixtures to be measured accurately over a wide range. A mathematical framework was developed to determine equilibrium adsorption capacities from the dynamic adsorption experiments and a method for quantitatively estimating the uncertainties of the measured capacities.
    Original languageEnglish
    QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
    Publication statusUnpublished - 2012

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Dynamic mixture measurements of commercial adsorbents for evaluating N2 + CH4 separations by pressure swing adsorption for liquefied natural gas production'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this