Drumming to a New Beat: A Group Therapeutic Drumming and Talking Intervention to Improve Mental Health and Behaviour of Disadvantaged Adolescent Boys

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Abstract

Background: This research examined the impact of a programme integrating therapeutic music and group discussions (Holyoake's DRUMBEAT programme) on disadvantaged adolescents’ mental wellbeing, psychological distress, post-traumatic stress symptoms and antisocial behaviour. Method: Students displaying antisocial behaviours in grades eight to ten at three socio-economically disadvantaged secondary schools in Perth, Western Australia were invited to participate in a 10-week DRUMBEAT programme (incorporating drumming with djembes, therapeutic discussions and a final performance). Eight DRUMBEAT programmes were held in 2014. Pre- and post-intervention questionnaires measured mental wellbeing (Warwick–Edinburgh Mental Wellbeing Scale), psychological distress (Kessler-5), post-traumatic stress symptoms (Abbreviated Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Checklist- Civilian Version) and antisocial behaviours (Adapted Self-Reported Delinquency Scale). Results: Of the 62 students completing DRUMBEAT, 41 completed pre- and post-questionnaires. Post-programme boys scored an average 7.6% higher mental wellbeing (WEMWBS) (p = .05), 19.3% lower post-traumatic stress symptoms (A PCL-C) (p = .05) and 23.9% lower antisocial behaviour (ARSDC) (p = .02). These changes were not evident for girls. No significant differences were detected for differences in psychological distress for either gender. Conclusion: This research highlights the potential of the DRUMBEAT programme as an effective, targeted strategy to reduce post-traumatic stress symptoms and antisocial behaviour and increase mental wellbeing in socio-economically disadvantaged adolescent boys.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-9
Number of pages9
JournalChildren Australia
Volume42
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

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Health Behavior
Vulnerable Populations
Mental Health
mental health
adolescent
Psychology
Group
questionnaire
Students
Therapeutics
Western Australia
Music
Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders
Checklist
Research
posttraumatic stress disorder
delinquency
group discussion
secondary school
music

Cite this

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title = "Drumming to a New Beat: A Group Therapeutic Drumming and Talking Intervention to Improve Mental Health and Behaviour of Disadvantaged Adolescent Boys",
abstract = "Background: This research examined the impact of a programme integrating therapeutic music and group discussions (Holyoake's DRUMBEAT programme) on disadvantaged adolescents’ mental wellbeing, psychological distress, post-traumatic stress symptoms and antisocial behaviour. Method: Students displaying antisocial behaviours in grades eight to ten at three socio-economically disadvantaged secondary schools in Perth, Western Australia were invited to participate in a 10-week DRUMBEAT programme (incorporating drumming with djembes, therapeutic discussions and a final performance). Eight DRUMBEAT programmes were held in 2014. Pre- and post-intervention questionnaires measured mental wellbeing (Warwick–Edinburgh Mental Wellbeing Scale), psychological distress (Kessler-5), post-traumatic stress symptoms (Abbreviated Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Checklist- Civilian Version) and antisocial behaviours (Adapted Self-Reported Delinquency Scale). Results: Of the 62 students completing DRUMBEAT, 41 completed pre- and post-questionnaires. Post-programme boys scored an average 7.6{\%} higher mental wellbeing (WEMWBS) (p = .05), 19.3{\%} lower post-traumatic stress symptoms (A PCL-C) (p = .05) and 23.9{\%} lower antisocial behaviour (ARSDC) (p = .02). These changes were not evident for girls. No significant differences were detected for differences in psychological distress for either gender. Conclusion: This research highlights the potential of the DRUMBEAT programme as an effective, targeted strategy to reduce post-traumatic stress symptoms and antisocial behaviour and increase mental wellbeing in socio-economically disadvantaged adolescent boys.",
keywords = "adolescent boys, antisocial behaviour, mental wellbeing, music therapy, post-traumatic stress, psychological distress",
author = "Karen Martin and Lisa Wood",
year = "2017",
doi = "10.1017/cha.2017.40",
language = "English",
volume = "42",
pages = "1--9",
journal = "Children Australia",
issn = "1035-0772",
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number = "4",

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T2 - A Group Therapeutic Drumming and Talking Intervention to Improve Mental Health and Behaviour of Disadvantaged Adolescent Boys

AU - Martin, Karen

AU - Wood, Lisa

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - Background: This research examined the impact of a programme integrating therapeutic music and group discussions (Holyoake's DRUMBEAT programme) on disadvantaged adolescents’ mental wellbeing, psychological distress, post-traumatic stress symptoms and antisocial behaviour. Method: Students displaying antisocial behaviours in grades eight to ten at three socio-economically disadvantaged secondary schools in Perth, Western Australia were invited to participate in a 10-week DRUMBEAT programme (incorporating drumming with djembes, therapeutic discussions and a final performance). Eight DRUMBEAT programmes were held in 2014. Pre- and post-intervention questionnaires measured mental wellbeing (Warwick–Edinburgh Mental Wellbeing Scale), psychological distress (Kessler-5), post-traumatic stress symptoms (Abbreviated Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Checklist- Civilian Version) and antisocial behaviours (Adapted Self-Reported Delinquency Scale). Results: Of the 62 students completing DRUMBEAT, 41 completed pre- and post-questionnaires. Post-programme boys scored an average 7.6% higher mental wellbeing (WEMWBS) (p = .05), 19.3% lower post-traumatic stress symptoms (A PCL-C) (p = .05) and 23.9% lower antisocial behaviour (ARSDC) (p = .02). These changes were not evident for girls. No significant differences were detected for differences in psychological distress for either gender. Conclusion: This research highlights the potential of the DRUMBEAT programme as an effective, targeted strategy to reduce post-traumatic stress symptoms and antisocial behaviour and increase mental wellbeing in socio-economically disadvantaged adolescent boys.

AB - Background: This research examined the impact of a programme integrating therapeutic music and group discussions (Holyoake's DRUMBEAT programme) on disadvantaged adolescents’ mental wellbeing, psychological distress, post-traumatic stress symptoms and antisocial behaviour. Method: Students displaying antisocial behaviours in grades eight to ten at three socio-economically disadvantaged secondary schools in Perth, Western Australia were invited to participate in a 10-week DRUMBEAT programme (incorporating drumming with djembes, therapeutic discussions and a final performance). Eight DRUMBEAT programmes were held in 2014. Pre- and post-intervention questionnaires measured mental wellbeing (Warwick–Edinburgh Mental Wellbeing Scale), psychological distress (Kessler-5), post-traumatic stress symptoms (Abbreviated Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Checklist- Civilian Version) and antisocial behaviours (Adapted Self-Reported Delinquency Scale). Results: Of the 62 students completing DRUMBEAT, 41 completed pre- and post-questionnaires. Post-programme boys scored an average 7.6% higher mental wellbeing (WEMWBS) (p = .05), 19.3% lower post-traumatic stress symptoms (A PCL-C) (p = .05) and 23.9% lower antisocial behaviour (ARSDC) (p = .02). These changes were not evident for girls. No significant differences were detected for differences in psychological distress for either gender. Conclusion: This research highlights the potential of the DRUMBEAT programme as an effective, targeted strategy to reduce post-traumatic stress symptoms and antisocial behaviour and increase mental wellbeing in socio-economically disadvantaged adolescent boys.

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KW - antisocial behaviour

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