Drought-Tolerant Brassica rapa Shows Rapid Expression of Gene Networks for General Stress Responses and Programmed Cell Death Under Simulated Drought Stress

Yiming Guo, Birgit Samans, Sheng Chen, Kidist B. Kibret, Sarah Hatzig, Neil C. Turner, Matthew N. Nelson, Wallace A. Cowling, Rod J. Snowdon

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Abstract

Production of oilseed rape/canola (Brassica napus) is increasingly threatened by dry conditions while the demand for vegetable oil is increasing. Brassica rapa is a genetically diverse ancestor of B. napus, and is readily crossed with B. napus. Recently, we reported promising levels of drought tolerance in a wild type of B. rapa which could be a source of drought tolerance for B. napus. We analysed global gene expression by messenger RNA sequencing in seedlings of the drought-tolerant and a drought-sensitive genotype of B. rapa under simulated drought stress and control conditions. A subset of stress-response genes were validated by reverse transcription quantitative PCR. Gene ontology enrichment analysis and pathway enrichment analysis revealed major differences between the two genotypes in the mode and onset of stress responses in the first 12 h of treatment. Drought-tolerant plants reacted uniquely and rapidly by upregulating genes associated with jasmonic acid and salicylic acid metabolism, as well as genes known to cause endoplasmic reticulum stress and induction of programmed cell death. Conversely, active responses in drought-sensitive plants were delayed until 8 or 12 h after stress application. The results may help to identify biomarkers for selection of breeding materials with potentially improved drought tolerance.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)416–430
Number of pages15
JournalPlant Molecular Biology Reporter
Volume35
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2017

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