Does the Key Task Measure Prospective Memory? Cautionary Findings from Parallel Studies in HIV Disease and Older Adults

Michelle Babicz, Kelli Sullivan, Michael Weinborn, Romola Bucks, Amanda Ng, Erica Hodgson, Denise Parker, Maria Pushpanathan, Lara Fine, Shayne Loft, Steven Woods

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: Despite its brevity and face validity, little is known about the construct validity of the naturalistic “Key Task” of prospective memory (PM), in which an examinee is instructed to remind the examiner at a designated time to retrieve keys (or another belonging) placed out of sight.
Method: Study 1 included 162 HIV+ and 52 HIV− comparison participants who completed the Key Task alongside well-validated measures of PM and a comprehensive neuropsychological battery that included everyday functioning measures. Study 2 used broadly parallel methods in 168 older community-dwelling Australians.
Results: Overall, the Key Task was not reliably associated with neurocognitive functioning (including clinical and experimental measures of PM), PM symptoms, or everyday functioning in either sample.
Conclusions: The Key Task did not demonstrate compelling evidence of construct validity among persons living with HIV disease or older adults, which raises doubts regarding its clinical usefulness as a measure of PM.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1438-1444
Number of pages7
JournalArchives of Clinical Neuropsychology
Volume34
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2019

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Episodic Memory
HIV
Independent Living
Reproducibility of Results

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title = "Does the Key Task Measure Prospective Memory? Cautionary Findings from Parallel Studies in HIV Disease and Older Adults",
abstract = "Objective: Despite its brevity and face validity, little is known about the construct validity of the naturalistic “Key Task” of prospective memory (PM), in which an examinee is instructed to remind the examiner at a designated time to retrieve keys (or another belonging) placed out of sight.Method: Study 1 included 162 HIV+ and 52 HIV− comparison participants who completed the Key Task alongside well-validated measures of PM and a comprehensive neuropsychological battery that included everyday functioning measures. Study 2 used broadly parallel methods in 168 older community-dwelling Australians.Results: Overall, the Key Task was not reliably associated with neurocognitive functioning (including clinical and experimental measures of PM), PM symptoms, or everyday functioning in either sample.Conclusions: The Key Task did not demonstrate compelling evidence of construct validity among persons living with HIV disease or older adults, which raises doubts regarding its clinical usefulness as a measure of PM.",
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Does the Key Task Measure Prospective Memory? Cautionary Findings from Parallel Studies in HIV Disease and Older Adults. / Babicz, Michelle ; Sullivan, Kelli; Weinborn, Michael; Bucks, Romola; Ng, Amanda; Hodgson, Erica; Parker, Denise; Pushpanathan, Maria; Fine, Lara; Loft, Shayne; Woods, Steven.

In: Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, Vol. 34, No. 8, 12.2019, p. 1438-1444.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Does the Key Task Measure Prospective Memory? Cautionary Findings from Parallel Studies in HIV Disease and Older Adults

AU - Babicz, Michelle

AU - Sullivan, Kelli

AU - Weinborn, Michael

AU - Bucks, Romola

AU - Ng, Amanda

AU - Hodgson, Erica

AU - Parker, Denise

AU - Pushpanathan, Maria

AU - Fine, Lara

AU - Loft, Shayne

AU - Woods, Steven

PY - 2019/12

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AB - Objective: Despite its brevity and face validity, little is known about the construct validity of the naturalistic “Key Task” of prospective memory (PM), in which an examinee is instructed to remind the examiner at a designated time to retrieve keys (or another belonging) placed out of sight.Method: Study 1 included 162 HIV+ and 52 HIV− comparison participants who completed the Key Task alongside well-validated measures of PM and a comprehensive neuropsychological battery that included everyday functioning measures. Study 2 used broadly parallel methods in 168 older community-dwelling Australians.Results: Overall, the Key Task was not reliably associated with neurocognitive functioning (including clinical and experimental measures of PM), PM symptoms, or everyday functioning in either sample.Conclusions: The Key Task did not demonstrate compelling evidence of construct validity among persons living with HIV disease or older adults, which raises doubts regarding its clinical usefulness as a measure of PM.

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KW - Disability

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