Do the eyes have it? A comparison of eye-movement and attentional-probe based approaches to indexing attentional control within the anti-saccade paradigm.

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Abstract

Individual differences in the ability to control visual attention, often termed ‘attentional
control’, has been of particular interest to cognitive researchers. Researchers’ interest in
attentional control has led to the development of specific tasks intended to measure this
attentional ability. One such task is the anti-saccade task. While attentional performance on
the anti-saccade task is typically indexed through the recording of eye movements,
increasingly researchers are reporting the use of probe-based methods of indexing
attentional performance on the task. Critically, no research has yet determined the
convergence of indices of performance yielded by each of these assessment methods, nor
compared the reliability of these indices. The purpose of the present study is to examine
whether the index of attentional control yielded by a probe-based adaptation of the task
converges with the index of attentional control provided by the traditional eye movement
task, and whether these alternative approaches have comparable levels of psychometric
reliability. The present study will require individuals to complete a probe-based task and an
eye movement task and an index of anti-saccade cost will be computed from each.
Correlational analyses will determine the degree to which the anti-saccade cost indices
provided by each task converge in their assessment of individual differences in attention
control. Further analyses will compare the internal consistency of these two anti-saccade cost
indices, and their reliability over time.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages21
JournalQuarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2020

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