Do field hockey players require a sport-specific biomechanical assessment to classify their anterior cruciate ligament injury risk?

Marc Smith, Gillian Weir, Cyril J. Donnelly, Jacqueline Alderson

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference paperConference paperpeer-review

    Abstract

    The lower limb biomechanics of 13 elite female hockey players were compared between 1) a generic, and 2) a hockey-specific (i.e., flexed trunk and hockey stick present) ACL injury risk movement assessment. Our aim was to determine if an athlete's ACL injury risk classification differed as a function of their movement assessment. An increase in trunk, hip and knee flexion was observed during the hockey-specific movement assessment. No significant differences in key ACL injury risk factors (i.e., peak three dimensional knee moments) were observed. These results show that imposing hockeyspecific requirements during a lab based movement assessment did not change an athlete's ACL injury risk classification when compared to a generic movement assessment.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationISBS Conference Proceedings: 34th International Conference on Biomechanics in Sports
    EditorsM Ae, Y. Enomoto, N. Fujii, H. Takagi
    PublisherInternational Society of Biomechanics in Sports
    Pages335-338
    ISBN (Print)1999-4168
    Publication statusPublished - 2016
    Event34th International Conference of Biomechanics in Sport - Tsukuba, Japan
    Duration: 18 Jun 201622 Jul 2016

    Conference

    Conference34th International Conference of Biomechanics in Sport
    Country/TerritoryJapan
    CityTsukuba
    Period18/06/1622/07/16

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