DNA evidence for morphological and cryptic cenozoic speciations in the Anaspididae, 'living fossils' from the triassic

S. N. Jarman, N. G. Elliott

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

53 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The speciation history of Anaspides tasmaniae (Crustacea: Malacostraca) and its close relatives (family Anaspididae) was studied by phylogenetic and molecular clock analyses of mitochondrial DNA sequences. The phylogenetic analyses revealed that the Anaspides morphotype conceals at least three cryptic species belonging to different parts of its range. The occurrence of multiple cryptic phylogenetic species within one morphological type shows that substantial genetic evolution has occurred independently of morphological evolution. Molecular clock dating of the speciation events that generated both the cryptic and the morphological species of Anaspididae indicated continuous speciation within this group since the Palaeocene ~55 million years ago. This relatively constant rate of recent morphological and cryptic speciation within the Anaspididae suggests that the speciation rate in this group does not correlate with its low extinction rate or morphological conservatism.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)624-633
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Evolutionary Biology
Volume13
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2000
Externally publishedYes

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