Diverging trends in gastroenteritis hospitalizations during 2 decades in western australian aboriginal and non-aboriginal children

Hannah Moore, K.R. Manoharan, F.J. Lim, Geoffrey Shellam, Deborah Lehmann

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7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Gastroenteritis is a major cause of pediatric morbidity. We describe temporal, spatial and seasonal trends in age-specific gastroenteritis hospitalizations among Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Australian children during 2 decades, providing a baseline to evaluate the impact of a rotavirus vaccine program begun in 2007. METHODS: We conducted a population-based, data linkage study of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal births in Western Australia, 1983 to 2006, and analyzed gastroenteritis-coded hospitalizations before age 15 years in the cohort of 596,465 births. Hospitalization rates in Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal children and between geographical regions were compared between 1983 to 1994 and 1995 to 2006. RESULTS: Gastroenteritis rates were highest in children 6-11 months of age (Aboriginal: 259.3/1000/annum; non-Aboriginal: 22.7/1000/annum). Rates declined in Aboriginal children between 1983 to 1994 and 1995 to 2006, particularly in those 12-17 months of age (309/1000 to 179/1000). Rates in non-Aboriginal children
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1169-1174
JournalPediatric Infectious Disease Journal
Volume32
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

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