Disruption of Short-Term Memory by Changing and Deviant Sounds: Support for a Duplex-Mechanism Account of Auditory Distraction

R.W. Hughes, F. Vachon, Dylan Jones

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

139 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The disruption of short-term memory by to-be-ignored auditory sequences (the changing-state effect) has often been characterized as attentional capture by deviant events (deviation effect). However, the present study demonstrates that changing-state and deviation effects are functionally distinct forms of auditory distraction: The disruption of visual-verbal serial recall by changing-state speech was independent of the effect of a single deviant voice embedded within the speech (Experiment 1); a voice-deviation effect, but not a changing-state effect, was found on a missing-item task (Experiment 2); and a deviant voice repetition within the context of an alternating-voice irrelevant speech sequence disrupted serial recall (Experiment 3). The authors conclude that the changing-state effect is the result of a conflict between 2 seriation processes being applied concurrently to relevant and irrelevant material, whereas the deviation effect reflects a more general attention-capture process.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1050-1061
JournalJournal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition
Volume33
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Disruption of Short-Term Memory by Changing and Deviant Sounds: Support for a Duplex-Mechanism Account of Auditory Distraction'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this