Disruption of a Sirt1-dependent autophagy checkpoint in the prostate results in prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia lesion formation

Michael J. Powell, Mathew C. Casimiro, Carlos Cordon-Cardo, Xiaohong He, Wen Shuz Yeow, Chenguang Wang, Peter A. McCue, Michael W. McBurney, Richard G. Pestell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

51 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Sirtuin family of proteins (SIRT) encode a group of evolutionarily conserved, NAD-dependent histone deacetylases, involved in many biological pathways. SIRT1, the human homologue of the yeast Silent Information Regulator 2 (Sir2) gene, deacetylates histones, p300, p53, and the androgen receptor. Autophagy is required for the degradation of damaged organelles and long-lived proteins, as well as for the development of glands such as the breast and prostate. Herein, homozygous deletion of the Sirt1 gene in mice resulted in prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) associated with reduced autophagy. Genome-wide gene expression analysis of Sirt1-/- prostates demonstrated that endogenous Sirt1 repressed androgen responsive gene expression and induced autophagy in the prostate. Sirt1 induction of autophagy occurred at the level of autophagosome maturation and completion in cultured prostate cancer cells. These studies provide novel evidence for a checkpoint function of Sirt1 in the development of PIN and further highlight a role for SIRT1 as a tumor suppressor in the prostate.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)964-975
Number of pages12
JournalCancer Research
Volume71
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2011
Externally publishedYes

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