Disaster response from Australia: what is the role of Forward Teams?

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Large scale Australian civilian medical assistance teams were first deployed overseas in 2004. The deployment of small Forward Teams in the early phase of a health disaster response allows for informed decisions on whether, and in what form, to deploy larger medical assistance teams. The prime consideration is to support the capacity of local services to respond to the specific needs of the affected population. In addition, Australian citizens caught up in large numbers in overseas disasters may need health assistance.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)249-252
Number of pages4
JournalTravel Medicine and Infectious Disease
Volume9
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011
Externally publishedYes

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title = "Disaster response from Australia: what is the role of Forward Teams?",
abstract = "Large scale Australian civilian medical assistance teams were first deployed overseas in 2004. The deployment of small Forward Teams in the early phase of a health disaster response allows for informed decisions on whether, and in what form, to deploy larger medical assistance teams. The prime consideration is to support the capacity of local services to respond to the specific needs of the affected population. In addition, Australian citizens caught up in large numbers in overseas disasters may need health assistance.",
keywords = "Australia, Disaster Medicine/manpower, Disaster Planning, Emergency Medical Services, Humans, Needs Assessment",
author = "Robertson, {A G} and Griffiths, {E K} and I Norton and Weeramanthri, {T S}",
year = "2011",
doi = "10.1016/j.tmaid.2011.06.004",
language = "English",
volume = "9",
pages = "249--252",
journal = "Travel Medicine and Infectious Disease",
issn = "1477-8939",
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}

Disaster response from Australia : what is the role of Forward Teams? / Robertson, A G; Griffiths, E K; Norton, I; Weeramanthri, T S.

In: Travel Medicine and Infectious Disease, Vol. 9, No. 5, 2011, p. 249-252.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

TY - JOUR

T1 - Disaster response from Australia

T2 - what is the role of Forward Teams?

AU - Robertson, A G

AU - Griffiths, E K

AU - Norton, I

AU - Weeramanthri, T S

PY - 2011

Y1 - 2011

N2 - Large scale Australian civilian medical assistance teams were first deployed overseas in 2004. The deployment of small Forward Teams in the early phase of a health disaster response allows for informed decisions on whether, and in what form, to deploy larger medical assistance teams. The prime consideration is to support the capacity of local services to respond to the specific needs of the affected population. In addition, Australian citizens caught up in large numbers in overseas disasters may need health assistance.

AB - Large scale Australian civilian medical assistance teams were first deployed overseas in 2004. The deployment of small Forward Teams in the early phase of a health disaster response allows for informed decisions on whether, and in what form, to deploy larger medical assistance teams. The prime consideration is to support the capacity of local services to respond to the specific needs of the affected population. In addition, Australian citizens caught up in large numbers in overseas disasters may need health assistance.

KW - Australia

KW - Disaster Medicine/manpower

KW - Disaster Planning

KW - Emergency Medical Services

KW - Humans

KW - Needs Assessment

U2 - 10.1016/j.tmaid.2011.06.004

DO - 10.1016/j.tmaid.2011.06.004

M3 - Review article

VL - 9

SP - 249

EP - 252

JO - Travel Medicine and Infectious Disease

JF - Travel Medicine and Infectious Disease

SN - 1477-8939

IS - 5

ER -