Dirk Hartog’s Sea Chest: An Affective Archaeology of VOC Objects in Australia

Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference paperChapter

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

This chapter charts the affective power and significance that Dutch East India Company (Vereenigde Oostindische Compagnie or VOC) objects have held from the seventeenth century to the present, because of their physical form and their location and assemblage with other objects on the Australian coast. The chapter explores how objects and people not only operate in relation to each other, but also in particular spaces and in specific historical contexts. Thus, the emotional and social power of these objects has created varied narratives over time that situate first the VOC, then the Dutch nation, as a global power, demonstrate the frailty of human capacity, celebrate the ambition and achievement of individual discoverers, and allow a new vision of Australia and its communities to emerge.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationFeeling Things
Subtitle of host publicationObjects and Emotions through History
EditorsStephanie Downes, Sally Holloway, Sarah Randles
Place of PublicationNew York
PublisherOxford University Press
Pages175-191
ISBN (Print)9780198802648
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

Fingerprint

Affective
Archaeology
Frailty
Coast
Assemblages
Ambition
Physical
Emotion
Social Power
Charts
Historical Context
Dutch East India Company

Cite this

Broomhall, S. M. (2018). Dirk Hartog’s Sea Chest: An Affective Archaeology of VOC Objects in Australia . In S. Downes, S. Holloway, & S. Randles (Eds.), Feeling Things: Objects and Emotions through History (pp. 175-191). New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/oso/9780198802648.003.0011
Broomhall, Susan Margaret. / Dirk Hartog’s Sea Chest : An Affective Archaeology of VOC Objects in Australia . Feeling Things: Objects and Emotions through History. editor / Stephanie Downes ; Sally Holloway ; Sarah Randles. New York : Oxford University Press, 2018. pp. 175-191
@inbook{0a59eba92fb7413eb47e4049a5823f78,
title = "Dirk Hartog’s Sea Chest: An Affective Archaeology of VOC Objects in Australia",
abstract = "This chapter charts the affective power and significance that Dutch East India Company (Vereenigde Oostindische Compagnie or VOC) objects have held from the seventeenth century to the present, because of their physical form and their location and assemblage with other objects on the Australian coast. The chapter explores how objects and people not only operate in relation to each other, but also in particular spaces and in specific historical contexts. Thus, the emotional and social power of these objects has created varied narratives over time that situate first the VOC, then the Dutch nation, as a global power, demonstrate the frailty of human capacity, celebrate the ambition and achievement of individual discoverers, and allow a new vision of Australia and its communities to emerge.",
author = "Broomhall, {Susan Margaret}",
year = "2018",
doi = "10.1093/oso/9780198802648.003.0011",
language = "English",
isbn = "9780198802648",
pages = "175--191",
editor = "Stephanie Downes and Sally Holloway and Sarah Randles",
booktitle = "Feeling Things",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
address = "United Kingdom",

}

Broomhall, SM 2018, Dirk Hartog’s Sea Chest: An Affective Archaeology of VOC Objects in Australia . in S Downes, S Holloway & S Randles (eds), Feeling Things: Objects and Emotions through History. Oxford University Press, New York, pp. 175-191. https://doi.org/10.1093/oso/9780198802648.003.0011

Dirk Hartog’s Sea Chest : An Affective Archaeology of VOC Objects in Australia . / Broomhall, Susan Margaret.

Feeling Things: Objects and Emotions through History. ed. / Stephanie Downes; Sally Holloway; Sarah Randles. New York : Oxford University Press, 2018. p. 175-191.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference paperChapter

TY - CHAP

T1 - Dirk Hartog’s Sea Chest

T2 - An Affective Archaeology of VOC Objects in Australia

AU - Broomhall, Susan Margaret

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - This chapter charts the affective power and significance that Dutch East India Company (Vereenigde Oostindische Compagnie or VOC) objects have held from the seventeenth century to the present, because of their physical form and their location and assemblage with other objects on the Australian coast. The chapter explores how objects and people not only operate in relation to each other, but also in particular spaces and in specific historical contexts. Thus, the emotional and social power of these objects has created varied narratives over time that situate first the VOC, then the Dutch nation, as a global power, demonstrate the frailty of human capacity, celebrate the ambition and achievement of individual discoverers, and allow a new vision of Australia and its communities to emerge.

AB - This chapter charts the affective power and significance that Dutch East India Company (Vereenigde Oostindische Compagnie or VOC) objects have held from the seventeenth century to the present, because of their physical form and their location and assemblage with other objects on the Australian coast. The chapter explores how objects and people not only operate in relation to each other, but also in particular spaces and in specific historical contexts. Thus, the emotional and social power of these objects has created varied narratives over time that situate first the VOC, then the Dutch nation, as a global power, demonstrate the frailty of human capacity, celebrate the ambition and achievement of individual discoverers, and allow a new vision of Australia and its communities to emerge.

U2 - 10.1093/oso/9780198802648.003.0011

DO - 10.1093/oso/9780198802648.003.0011

M3 - Chapter

SN - 9780198802648

SP - 175

EP - 191

BT - Feeling Things

A2 - Downes, Stephanie

A2 - Holloway, Sally

A2 - Randles, Sarah

PB - Oxford University Press

CY - New York

ER -

Broomhall SM. Dirk Hartog’s Sea Chest: An Affective Archaeology of VOC Objects in Australia . In Downes S, Holloway S, Randles S, editors, Feeling Things: Objects and Emotions through History. New York: Oxford University Press. 2018. p. 175-191 https://doi.org/10.1093/oso/9780198802648.003.0011